Patricia Dunn-Walker is originally from Illinois, where she received her training in graphic design. She moved to Minnesota to pursue a career in design. After working in design for a number of years, she took a yearlong break to teach English in Japan. As a result of being immersed in such a visually rich and ancient culture, she was inspired to shift her focus from commercial work to fine art.

Throughout the years, Dunn-Walker has exhibited her work around southeastern Minnesota and the Twin Cities in solo and group exhibitions. She was the recipient of the Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council Legacy grant, creating a body of work focusing on female heroes and more.

"Germinate" by Patricia Dunn-Walker
"Germinate" by Patricia Dunn-Walker

Dunn-Walker, who lives in Rochester, has work in private collections around the U.S. She has a portrait of an essential worker in Rochester Art Center’s "Lifeline" exhibit. She also accepts commission work. More of her work can be seen at www.patriciadunnwalker.com.

"Sea Garden" by Patricia Dunn-Walker
"Sea Garden" by Patricia Dunn-Walker

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She says: "As an artist, my process involves combining paint, paper and found materials in unexpected ways. I often start out by creating a structure, such as an abstract design, a cityscape or a face. I love layering paper and paint, sometimes subtracting parts from each layer. This method can be great fun and add surprising meaning to my work. I work toward making each picture an organic whole. I worked as a graphic designer for a number of years and really enjoy working with type. I often incorporate letters into my work, not so much for their meaning, but because I love their shape, weight and the patterns they make.

"I am intrigued by outdoor kiosks and billboards. A flier advertising an event is posted, and when it is over, another event is plastered on top of it. After a certain amount of time outdoors, weathering creates an aging, blurring effect, making it more difficult to know which event came first. The cumulative effect is that of a rich, old tapestry that tells a story."