When Statehouse recorded " You Know I Should Be Leaving Soon," they had no way of knowing they’d be leaving each other before their EP could even be released.  

Wyatt Moran, a Rochester bassist and singer, graduated from Century High School in 2019 and headed to Boston to study at Berklee College of Music.  Like many other first-year college students, despite some uncertainty, he started finding a place for himself.  

He met his roommate Ben Gurnon, a drummer, and the two kicked around the idea of starting a band as a duo.  The idea solidified this past September when they were introduced to guitarist and singer Gia Flores, who floated the idea of a trio. After consulting a Minnesota map for a band name, weekly Friday rehearsals focusing on writing original music, and even playing a packed show in a practice room, the band took shape.        

Though the three came from widely separate places—Gurnon hails from Exeter, RI and Flores from Cornwall, NY—their fortuitous meeting brought their unique music into the world.  The last week of their break in January, they met in Rhode Island at Gurnon’s house to record an EP and then headed to Allston, MA near Boston to play a show with Minnesotan band Why Notat O’Brien’s Pub.  

{{tncms-inline content="<p>“I think a lot of people our age are having a feeling of mortality for maybe the first time in their lives, and are having that ‘where did the time go’ moment."</p> <p>-Ben Gurnon</p>" id="9be534f4-17e6-4ace-a405-fd6033e2a905" style-type="quote" title=" " type="relcontent"}}

"The entire week was just waking up at noon and recording all day, often late into the evening," says Moran.  "We would cook for ourselves almost every night, too. It was like a dream vacation, to be honest— just recording and hanging out and listening to good music and eating good food with two good friends."

Their recording produced six songs that made it on to the EP, which they planned to finish together.

But now all three members are completing their second semester of college online, far from Berklee and each other. "We’re all super close friends and now live hundreds of miles away from each other," says Moran. "It’s really frustrating to have to postpone your whole academic career, especially so because there’s obviously no other solutions to this pandemic at the moment."

Moran credits a lot of the band’s sound to their environment at school. "Berklee and all of the people I’ve met there have been so massive in how we developed as a band and the shows we played in Boston," he says. "The scenes in both Berklee circles as well as DIY in the suburbs are incredible. There are easily two or three shows happening every Friday and Saturday the entire year."

Moran took notes remotely from Gurnon and Flores to finish the mastering process of their EP, a necessary measure that wasn't ideal. "It was definitely different than the three of us sitting in front of a set of speakers and doing notes," says Moran. "At the same time, all of us want to be ethical and make decisions that honor the wellbeing of others and ourselves."  

It was important to the band to release their music despite their physical separation and the uncertainty created by the pandemic.  They wanted their friends and family to listen to it during quarantine. "A lot of the songs on the record are about learning how to do things by yourself for the first time and dealing with insecurities and anxieties the three of us experienced this year," says Moran. "We thought if we could help other people figure out how to deal with all of the things happening in the world right now, or at least let them know that there are other people that feel exactly the same as they do, then it made more sense to release it then wait until we could support it with a show or a tour."

One of Gurnon’s favorite cuts from the EP is the song "Dying."  

"I think a lot of people our age are having a feeling of mortality for maybe the first time in their lives, and are having that ‘where did the time go’ moment," he says. The song’s lyrics seem to fit present circumstances in some eerie ways: "I’m not scared of death, but I am scared of dying./What happens to these friends, these friends that I’ve been finding."  

The first song the band wrote together, "Moving it Slow" is the song Flores would recommend to a new listener.  "I think it summarizes our sound best," she says.  Statehouse might have to be "moving it slow" for the foreseeable future with their April and May shows cancelled, but they are looking forward to meeting once again in Boston on Boylston Street and grabbing a burrito together at Amelias’ Taqueria.    

"If there were a way for all of us to be together and work on music together, we’d probably be doing it," says Moran.

Until that happens, the band will be sharing their music from afar via their online release of "You Know I Should Be Leaving Soon."

{{tncms-inline content="<p>Want to listen to Statehouse’s "You Know I Should Be Leaving Soon" EP? Stream it on <a href="https://open.spotify.com/album/1xWt3RYfC19zaInRgW8gqi?si=PhD9RwwKSD-b__UkAcxGSg" target="_blank">Spotify</a> or find it on <a href="https://statehouseband.bandcamp.com/album/you-know-i-should-be-leaving-soon" target="_blank">Bandcamp</a>.</p> <p>See what happens for Statehouse next by following them on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/statehouseband/" target="_blank">Facebook</a> or <a href="https://www.instagram.com/statehouseband/" target="_blank">Instagram</a>.</p>" id="ef132ec4-854b-4e73-b2ca-33247d25b6e3" style-type="info" title="Listen to the songs!" type="relcontent"}}

Want to listen to Statehouse’s "You Know I Should Be Leaving Soon" EP? Stream it on Spotifyor find it on Bandcamp.

See what happens for Statehouse next by following them on Facebookor Instagram.

"I think a lot of people our age are having a feeling of mortality for maybe the first time in their lives, and are having that ‘where did the time go’ moment."

-Ben Gurnon