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Tracy Briggs

Tracy Briggs is a News, Lifestyle and History reporter with Forum Communications with more than 30 years of experience.

Tracy began her career as a full-time broadcast journalist - producing, reporting and anchoring the news at WDAY-TV in 1988. The love of history stories started when Tracy did a yearlong series on North Dakota's Centennial in 1989 and another yearlong series, "Our Century" in 1999 about the biggest 20th century news in our region. The following year, the series "Our People" covered notable people in our communities.

After 17 years in television news, Tracy wanted a schedule more conducive to being a mom of two young children. So she took a job as a morning drive time radio talk show host in 2005. During that time, she headed up the WDAY Honor Flight, a community-led project to take WWII veterans on a free trip to Washington D.C. She's been working in digital content and multimedia news with Inforum and The Forum since 2010.

From 2010 to 2020, she wrote and appeared in two weekly lifestyle segments, "The Great Indoors," and "The Scoop with Tracy Briggs," which focused largely on food and baking. In 2021, she started the column, "Back Then with Tracy Briggs" which helps readers walk down memory lane and celebrate those people making good news in our community. She also is a contributor to Forum Communication's true crime site, "The Vault" where she writes stories and does podcasts about historical true crime.

She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from the University of North Dakota in 1986 and a Master of Arts in Mass Communication from North Dakota State University in 2001. When she's not in the archives or writing, she loves to bake, do genealogy and unwind with way too much TV. She also loves to spend time with her husband and two daughters (Four daughters, if you count her two crazy dogs, McKenna and Winnipeg). She speaks English, but wishes she had kept up with her high school French. She knows she's way too old, but still enjoys boy bands and vintage Barbies.

If you have ideas for historical stories, you can reach Tracy at tracy.briggs@forumcomm.com or call 701-219-0748 or on Facebook at Tracy Briggs @BackThenTB.

Exclusive
In 1972, kidnappers took his mother away and demanded his father deliver the $1 million ransom. Virginia Piper's son remembers the traumatic day 50 years ago that changed his family forever.
Whether it was the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated or when planes hit the World Trade Center, early news memories stick with you.
With just 16 days before the statute of limitations ran out on the kidnapping of a wealthy Orono, Minn., woman in 1972, the FBI indicted two men in the crime. But the case was far from over. In fact, the roller coaster ride was just beginning. Here is Part 3 of "The Kidnapping of Virginia Piper — 50 years later."
40 years ago this summer, Robert Asp's Hjemkomst ship journeyed to Norway and into the history books.
Following the 1972 kidnapping of Virginia "Ginny" Piper of Orono, Minnesota, the FBI interviewed an estimated 1,000 people. One of the suspects at the top of the list was a man on the verge of committing a mass murder. Here is Part 2 in "The Kidnapping of Virginia Piper — 50 years later."
The kidnapping of Virginia Piper is considered one of the most successful kidnappings in U.S. history. Now 50 years after the Twin Cities socialite was grabbed from her garden, Forum Communications takes a fresh look at the case with updated reports and new podcasts and videos, plus exclusive interviews with those involved.
Jay Johnson, the great-grandson of a Civil War veteran, is grateful to share his family's treasures at the Battle Lake, Minn., museum.
We asked readers to weigh in on their favorite commercials and jingles over the years. And many of you had the same handful of answers, "Back Then" columnist Tracy Briggs says.
Letters and diary entries spell out the family impact of losing two of their three sons in just six months.
When you only have 3 or 4 stations, you tend to hear the same commercials over and over again, and boy do we remember them. "Back Then" columnist Tracy Briggs wants to know your favorites.