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Med City data center powering up for an almost $4 million upgrade

A former Mayo Clinic data center, now owned by Epic Systems, is slated to get an almost $4 million upgrade in west Rochester.

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A former Mayo Clinic data center is slated to get an almost $4 million upgrade.

Wisconsin-based Epic Systems filed for a Rochester building permit this week “for the Installation of new mechanical and electrical equipment, modifications to existing HVAC and electrical systems serving data hall and support space” in its 77,000-square-foot data center at 4710 West Circle Drive.

The cost of the project is estimated at $3.9 million.

Epic, the company that upgraded Mayo Clinic’s electronic health records system for $1.5 billion , purchased the data center from Mayo Clinic in 2016.

The Verona, Wis. firm paid $46 million for the center . Epic also worked with Rochester Public Utilities to build a new $6.1 million substation to help power the data center. RPU paid $1.016 million for the project, and Epic financed the rest.

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Mayo Clinic originally built the center in 2012 for $33.7 million to support all three of Mayo Clinic's campuses — Rochester, Jacksonville, Fla., and Scottsdale, Ariz.

In 2016, Bruce Richards, Epic's director of facilities and engineering, told the RPU board that his company would bring 80 to 90 employees to Rochester to staff the data center.

Epic, which reported an annual revenue of $3.2 billion in 2019, reportedly manages about 60 percent of the private patient medical records in the U.S.

Jeff Kiger tracks business action in Rochester and southeastern Minnesota every day in Heard on the Street. Send tips to jkiger@postbulletin.com or via Twitter to @whereskiger . You can call him at 507-285-7798.

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Epic Systems filed for a Rochester building permit this week “for the Installation of new mechanical and electrical equipment, modifications to existing HVAC and electrical systems serving data hall and support space” in its 77,000-square-foot data center at 4710 West Circle Drive.

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