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1922: Buffalo on the way to Mayo Park

Highlights of events in 1997, 1972, 1947 and 1922.

Day in History graphic
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1997 – 25 years ago

  • Researchers have cloned an adult mammal — a 6-year-old sheep — for the first time, an astonishing scientific landmark. The feat opens the door to cloning prized farm animals. President Clinton has asked for a bioethics advisory commission to review the ethical and legal implications.

1972 – 50 years ago

  • The speed limit on Elton Hills Drive between Viking Drive and 13th Avenue NW can be lowered from 35 mph to 30 mph, according to the state highway department.
  • Pat O’ Connor won a 10-round decision over Benny “Kid” Barra of Mexico before a crowd of 2,600 at Mayo Civic Auditorium.
  • The Montgomery, Minn., School Board voted to suspend the high school dress code for one week in the wake of student protests.

1947 – 75 years ago

  • The new 1947 Hudsons are now on display. The impressive massive grill and newly positioned front bumper guards, along with the double-safe hydraulic brakes with a mechanical reserve braking system, make it a safe choice, the company says.
  • Wanted: A single man, diligent worker, for year-round work. Pay is $100 per month and bonuses. Small separate house provided; milk, fuel, potatoes, and lights furnished.

1922 – 100 years ago

  • Chatfield will be without electrical power for a week after the havoc wrought by this week's winter storm. All lines are down. Residents will need to use oil lamps.
  • The Rochester Park Board received a telegram, which stated that a buffalo from Oklahoma was being shipped to Mayo Park. The buffalo weighs 1,000 pounds and is said to be "a splendid and handsome animal." For the remainder of the winter, the buffalo will be kept in the basement of the barn on the Mayo ball field grounds.
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