Rochester Downtown Alliance Marketing Manager Nicholas Molina is happy to call Rochester home — again.

“I moved around a lot because my parents, who are doctors at Mayo Clinic, had been going through the steps of their medical training,” Molina said. “In total, I have lived in eight cities” — Rochester, Cincinnati, North College Hill (Ohio), San Antonio, Iowa City, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Medellín, Colombia. That is where his parents, youngest brother and all extended family are from, he said.

After attending grammar and high school here, the Lourdes 2009 graduate left for nearly a decade before moving back. He attended the University of Iowa in Iowa City, lived in Medellín and then went to Milwaukee where he graduated from Marquette University with a degree in journalism.

Today, outside of the RDA, Molina is a vice president of the Alliance of Chicanos, Hispanics and Latin Americans (ACHLA) and is also involved in events at Threshold Arts at the Castle.

Tell us a bit about your style.

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I’d say my main style is a straight-up greaser. Besides that, I bounce between levels of business casual, artsy and sporty. This year, we’ve had a lot warmer and nicer weather, so I’ve explored the floral short-sleeve button-ups.

Nicholas Molina Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Rochester. Joe Ahlquist / Post Bulletin
Nicholas Molina Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Rochester. Joe Ahlquist / Post Bulletin

Influences?

My family in Colombia has excellent style, which has influenced what styles I blend and what colors I try. There are also certain other key figures, friends, who have helped shape it as well.

Colombian style I would say takes a lot of influence from European styles. Typically you see a lot of name brand clothing — polos are common — although I personally don’t wear polos. Mostly, you see colorful bright shirts — T-shirts and polos — with dark jeans and white sneakers and a leather motorcycle jacket. I only take a bit from this style. I’d say my style is reminiscent of Latin American as whole as opposed to being more tethered to a Colombian style.

What do you hope your style communicates?

Without going too deep into it, I’d say the ability to combine opposite styles and find a nice mix from it. I see this as my cross-cultural narrative — i.e., being a first-generation American and growing up between both cultures.

What are the most important components of your work wardrobe?

Blazers and sport jackets. I think they add another dimension to the work style. And, also, they may add a level of formality — for those certain moments when it’s needed.

And outside of work?

It depends on the season. Right now, for summer, its ripped jeans with a floral button-up and some beat up boots. During fall and winter, I start opting for jackets and pea coats and long-sleeve button ups.

Nicholas Molina Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Rochester. Joe Ahlquist / Post Bulletin
Nicholas Molina Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Rochester. Joe Ahlquist / Post Bulletin

What should every well-dressed man have in his wardrobe?

A few blazers. A good pair of boots — remember the more beat up they get, the cooler they look. And men’s jewelry. I personally collect watches, but I recommend something to add to your individual style.

Are you a bowtie or necktie person?

Necktie, definitely!

Please tell us a little about your favorite footwear.

I am a bonafide lover of boots, especially anything that reverberates a vintage-esque style. I especially love lace-ups in the combat/old-school military style.

Do you have a priceless sentimental item(s)?

I have certain pieces such as old skeletons keys and coins that I have made into necklaces, I don’t wear them much, since I fear losing them.

Nicholas Molina Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Rochester. Joe Ahlquist / Post Bulletin
Nicholas Molina Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Rochester. Joe Ahlquist / Post Bulletin

Is there something surprising in your wardrobe?

I have bright red chino pants that I wore once in Colombia — and sadly, I don’t think I’ll wear them again.

How do you see Rochester’s style downtown and around town?

I think as Mayo continues to expand and bring in more staff from around the world and the local universities continue to grow, I think we will start seeing more and more styles from different parts of the country and the world.

Parting thoughts or advice for readers?

I’d recommend finding a good barber or hairdresser. It is crazy to me how many people opt for a basic hair cut simply because ‘that’s how they’ve always done it.’ Instead, go out there and explore a bit — and maybe just maybe you will find something truly incredible.

Do you know someone who has unique style? Send nominations to life@postbulletin.com with "Your Style" in the subject line.