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Friends of the Refuge Headwaters announces photo contest winners

Photographers are recognized for their views of the Upper Mississippi.

Wildlife-1-Trumpeter-on-Chilly-Morning-by-Lisa-Reid.jpg
A photo by Lisa Reid of a trumpeter swan won “Wildlife of the Refuge” category in the Friends of the Refuge Headwaters group photography contest. (Contributed photo)

Although the COVID-19 pandemic canceled many planned events worldwide, one annual event seemed perfect for the times.

The Friends of the Refuge Headwaters group held a wildlife photography contest. Finding vantage points to capture the beauty of the northernmost area of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge was a perfect distancing activity.

Most of the winners came from the bluff-lined city of Winona, with Lewis Shira, of Winona, winning the best young photographer category.

Theresa Kuschel, of La Crescent, took first place in “Scenic Views of the Refuge.”

Lisa Reid, of Trempealeau, Wis., won “Wildlife and Plants of the Refuge” with her photo of a trumpeter swan.

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Denise Vujnovich, of La Crosse, Wis., won the “Connecting People with Nature on the Refuge” category.

Winning photographs can be found online at friendsoftherefugeheadwaters.org .

John Weiss and Rick Frietsche, both -0of Rochester, and Heidi Bryant, of Winona, judged the contest.

Related Topics: ART
John Molseed joined the Post Bulletin in 2018. He covers arts, culture, entertainment, nature and other fun stories he's surprised he gets paid to cover. When he's not writing articles about Southeast Minnesota artists and musicians, he's either picking banjo, brewing beer, biking or looking for other hobbies that begin with the letter "b." Readers can reach John at 507-285-7713 or jmolseed@postbulletin.com.
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