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Lauren unveils Olympic uniforms — made in USA

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This product image released by Ralph Lauren shows American hockey player Zach Parise wearing the official uniform for Team USA to be worn at the opening ceremony for the 2014 Winter Olympic games in Sochi, Russia. Every article of clothing made by Ralph Lauren for the U.S. Winter Olympic athletes in Sochi, including their opening and closing ceremony uniforms and their Olympic Village gear, has been made by domestic craftsman and manufacturers. (AP Photo/Ralph Lauren)

NEW YORK — Designer Ralph Lauren's new Olympic opening ceremony uniform has lots of stars and stripes. It has lots of red, white and blue. And most importantly, it has a Made in America label.

The new look features a knit patchwork cardigan emblazoned with big stars, an American flag, and the Olympic rings. Underneath, there's a cream cotton turtleneck, white athletic pants, and black leather boots. There's also a wool "reindeer hat" — with braided tassels — also in red, white and blue, of course.

The most important feature, though, is its provenance — the United States. During the 2012 London games, Lauren's uniforms were a point of controversy when it was revealed that much of them were made overseas, especially in China. Ralph Lauren Corp. got the message.

"A dynamic mix of patriotic references in a classic color palette of red, white and navy defines the Ralph Lauren 2014 Team USA Opening ceremony uniform, which is proudly Made in America," the company said in a statement Thursday.

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