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Local experts: Even you can grow these plants, flowers

Flowers and plants that local experts say even you can grow

Salvia

Salvia

“My favorite low-maintenance trees are slow-growing trees such as oak, and medium-growth trees like a little leaf linden tree. Some low-maintenance landscape shrubs are spireas, hydrangeas, and dogwoods. The reason I like these plants is because they are not extremely picky when it comes to when or how much to trim. Plants that will re-bloom such as the Stella De Oro daylily and perennial salvias are great, too.”

—Megan Magee, Family Tree Nursery

“For flowering perennials, you can’t go wrong with hostas. If there was ever a popularity contest for perennials, the hosta would surely prevail. Reliable and hardy with countless combinations of leaf color, shape, and texture, hostas are perennials that have won the hearts of northern gardeners with their fabulous foliage. Hostas can survive in deep shade and can be planted in large masses for reliable color and texture in the garden. They are adaptable to many sites, and are generally easy to grow even for inexperienced gardeners.”

—University of Minnesota’s Olmsted County Extension Office staff

“Another can’t-miss flowering perennial is the tall garden phlox. They have long-blooming, colorful flowers that pop in any garden. Tall garden phlox are hardy and vigorous when grown in the right conditions. These perennial flowers are often used as background plants in narrow borders or in groups between taller and shorter plants in a wide border. Count on tall garden phlox (Phlox paniculata hybrids) to provide a colorful summer display in perennial gardens, blooming as much as six weeks or more. Some cultivars begin blooming in mid-summer, others not until late August. Most tall garden phlox grow two to three feet, with some slightly taller.”

—University of Minnesota’s Olmsted County Extension Office staff

“If you’re looking for a shrub, bush honeysuckles (Diervilla spp.) are easy-to-grow, low-growing, suckering plants. They are adaptable to many soil types and all light levels. Because of their suckering habits, these plants are good for mass plantings, hedges, or on slopes for soil stabilization and erosion control. Bush honeysuckle’s tolerance to drought and soil compaction provides additional landscape benefits. They are three to five feet tall (and wide) and most of the bloom occurs in June and July. The flowers attract bumblebees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds.”

—University of Minnesota’s Olmsted County Extension Office staff

“Lilies, iris, hosta, clematis, sedum … Add a few of these each year to your flower beds to fill in around your annuals. In a few years you will be able to divide them for your own gardens or share with friends. Plant several different types to have colorful blossoms spring through fall.”

—Joel Flemke, Joel’s Greenhouse

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