Ivanka Trump makes surprise stop in Rochester

About 200 people showed up outside the Trump campaign headquarters in Rochester for a whistle stop by first daughter Ivanka Trump Friday morning.

Trump stopped by, took photos and energized a crowd of President Trump's volunteers and supporters.

Dolly Knutson got a selfie with Ivanka Trump after the first daughter heard Knutson was 97 years old.

Read the full story by Brian Todd here.

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Mayo program focuses on post-COVID syndrome

Mayo Clinic physical therapist Mike Trenary monitors a patient's blood oxygen level during exercise therapy at the Northwest Clinic Thursday, September 24, 2020. Trenary works with recovering COVID-19 patients to rebuild their heart and lung function after the disease passes. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)
Mayo Clinic physical therapist Mike Trenary monitors a patient's blood oxygen level during exercise therapy at the Northwest Clinic Thursday, September 24, 2020. Trenary works with recovering COVID-19 patients to rebuild their heart and lung function after the disease passes. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)

Rochester resident Deanne Engen went to bed one evening in late August feeling fine.

The 27-year-old mom and Mayo Clinic employee had tested positive for COVID-19 a week and half ago, and symptoms up to then had been pretty mild: A run-of-the-mill cough, sore throat and runny nose. She thought the disease was in the rear-view mirror.

She woke up the next morning with her symptoms a "1,000 times worse." Suddenly, her cough, runny nose, headache and fatigue were, as she describes it, "horrible."

Read the full story by Matthew Stolle here.

Minnesota health officials stopped reporting COVID-19 hospitalizations. Why?

Pet Linforth/Pixabay
Pet Linforth/Pixabay

It was just another announcement at the start of a recent Minnesota Department of Health COVID-19 press briefing. There have been over 100 of them by now, so it flew under the radar.

After the standard daily recitation by state Commissioner of Health Jan Malcolm on global, national and statewide COVID-19 case and fatality numbers — a process meant to convey urgency about the illness — state director of infectious disease Kris Ehresmann said that the state had changed the way it would release COVID-19 hospitalization data.

Until then, a person could log on to MDH webpage each day and learn how many Minnesotans were hospitalized with the illness overall, and how many were in the ICU. The numbers have been as high as the 600s and 300s, but have dropped in an encouraging fashion since the middle of summer. This week, they were hovering at around 250 total, 114 in the ICU.

Read the full story by Paul John Scott here.

Warming center guest died days after fall from top bunk

Bunk beds are used at the Rochester Community Warming Center at 200 Fourth St. SE. Using specified protocols in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the facility has the capacity to shelter 20 people each night, with some in top bunks. (Post Bulletin file photo)
Bunk beds are used at the Rochester Community Warming Center at 200 Fourth St. SE. Using specified protocols in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the facility has the capacity to shelter 20 people each night, with some in top bunks. (Post Bulletin file photo)

A Rochester Community Warming Center guest died earlier this month, days after reportedly sustaining head injuries from a fall from the top bunk of a bed.

Cindy Lue Schulz, 59, was staying at the center at 200 Fourth Ave. SE on Sept. 5 when the incident occurred shortly after 9 p.m. in the Olmsted County-owned building, which is operated by Catholic Charities of Southern Minnesota.

Schulz died on Sept. 9, after being taken to Mayo Clinic Hospital-Saint Marys following the fall from 5.5 feet, according to information released by the Southern Minnesota Regional Medical Examiner’s Office.

Read the full story by Randy Petersen here.

Lewiston-Altura staff express concerns about learning model

The Lewiston-Altura School District began the school year with in-person and hybrid classes, despite having a COVID-19 infection rate that far exceeded state guidelines for doing so.

Superintendent Gwen Carman says the district has to look at more specific numbers than those provided for Winona County at large. But other issues have been raised, such as whether the district communicates enough with area families about positive cases and whether the district is being fully transparent about its process.

Minnesota Department of Education guidelines regarding how schools should operate during the pandemic are based on the number of new infections per 10,000 people over a 14-day period.

Read the full story by Jordan Shearer here.