Former teacher at Rochester's Alternative Learning Center murdered in New Orleans

A former Rochester Alternative Learning Center high school instructor was fatally stabbed Wednesday in New Orleans, and her killer is being sought by police there, according to nola.com in New Orleans.

Liz Quackenbush, 39, was found dead from stab wounds to her head and face in the St. Claude neighborhood of New Orleans. Area media report that police are looking for Preston Higgs, 36, who is believed to be the suspect in the slaying. He faces a count of second-degree murder.

New Orleans police authorities say Higgs lived with Quackenbush and was her boyfriend, nola.com reports.

Read the full story by Matthew Stolle here.

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Rochester mask disagreement leads to assault charge

A disagreement over masking practices led to a trip to the hospital for a Rochester woman on Thursday, along with an assault charge for a Rochester man.

Rochester Police were called to Kohl’s Department Store, 20 25th St. SE, shortly after 1 p.m. Thursday based on a report that a man, later identified as Levi Solland, 29, had allegedly pushed a 61-year-old outside the store, according to Rochester Police Capt. Casey Moilanen.

When officers arrived, they found the woman on the ground, and she reported she had pulled her mask down while in the store’s checkout line due to difficulty breathing.

Read the full story here.


Can this woman revive the Art Center?

Rochester Art Center Director, Pamela Hugdahl, February 8, 2021. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)
Rochester Art Center Director, Pamela Hugdahl, February 8, 2021. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)

When Pamela Hugdahl became the executive director of Rochester Art Center last summer, she faced a pandemic, financial difficulties … and nearly 75 years of history.

The 36,000-square-foot RAC has come a long way from its beginnings in a couple of unused rooms of the Rochester Public Library, and it nearly went under in 2017. But Hugdahl, who started her new position on June 1—one month before RAC reopened after three months of COVID-19 lockdown—is optimistic we need art more than ever.

And she’s looking back as much as she’s looking forward to deliver it: “We are going back to our roots. We are now focusing on our mission, on our articles of incorporation, and what we were founded to do in 1946.”

Read the full story from Rochester Magazine here.


Chatfield wrestlers making all the right moves

The Chatfield wrestling team is led by a strong group of four seniors. From left are: Cody Guenther, Seth Goetzinger, A.J. Karver, and Tate Karver. March 3, 2021. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)
The Chatfield wrestling team is led by a strong group of four seniors. From left are: Cody Guenther, Seth Goetzinger, A.J. Karver, and Tate Karver. March 3, 2021. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)

Don’t be misled by what’s going on in the Chatfield wrestling room a few hours before a competition.

Yeah, there’s lots of laughing and shouting in there among the Gophers wrestlers, as they play games of Spikeball and Four Square.

But they’re doing it for the right reason. It allows them to establish the proper mindset, not the other way around. This is a senior-led bunch that loves to compete, no matter what it’s in. And they also like to enter each wrestling match as physically and mentally loose as they can.

Read the full story by Pat Ruff here.


How the pandemic will shape today's youth

Eight local youths known as Zoomers, or Gen Z, give their thoughts on their future. They are, clockwise from top, middle: Luke Drake, Alexus Heins, Makayla Kennedy, Daniel Ma, Erin Stoeckig, Adam McPhail, Alissa Halvorson, and Ava Jovaag. (Post Bulletin photo illustration)
Eight local youths known as Zoomers, or Gen Z, give their thoughts on their future. They are, clockwise from top, middle: Luke Drake, Alexus Heins, Makayla Kennedy, Daniel Ma, Erin Stoeckig, Adam McPhail, Alissa Halvorson, and Ava Jovaag. (Post Bulletin photo illustration)

People don't typically view themselves as being shaped by events unless they have been hit by a two-by-four.

And today's youth have been gobsmacked by three epic events: a once-in-a-century pandemic, a recession and, in the midst of both, a global reckoning on racism sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

And it will shape and change them in ways that will echo through their lives.

Read the full story by Matthew Stolle here.