Protest greets volunteer egg-addling effort in Silver Lake Park

Approximately 25 Rochester residents turned out Wednesday morning as volunteers gathered to addle goose eggs in Silver Lake Park.

Some protesters were opposed to the method used to impede development of the eggs, and others were upset that any effort was being done in an attempt to manage the goose population.

“We spent many years making this their home,” said Megan Mathis, who recalled years of visiting the park to see goslings after they hatched.

Read the full story by Randy Petersen here.

Newsletter signup for email alerts


'We finally did it': Hayfield gets its storybook ending

Hayfield head coach Chris Pack celebrates with the fans following the Viking's 61-60 win in the Class A state boys basketball championship game against Hancock on Saturday, April 10, 2021, at the Target Center in Minneapolis. (Andrew Link / alink@postbulletin.com)
Hayfield head coach Chris Pack celebrates with the fans following the Viking's 61-60 win in the Class A state boys basketball championship game against Hancock on Saturday, April 10, 2021, at the Target Center in Minneapolis. (Andrew Link / alink@postbulletin.com)

Sixty minutes after the final buzzer sounded at Target Center Saturday afternoon, Chris Pack’s phone had received 70 text messages.

The calls, texts, Facebook messages and the rest of the outpouring of support on social media was just starting for the Hayfield head coach. Pack and the Vikings were the talk of the town after beating Hancock 61-60 to win the program's first state championship, but he still really hadn’t come to grips with the reality of the moment.

The Vikings had done it. Finally.

Read the full story by Isaac Trotter here.


Winona County dairy farmer packs up and leaves with 245 cows: 'We're not able to grow anymore'

Dairy cows get loaded onto a trailer headed to Colorado Thursday, April 8, 2021, south of Lewiston. Parker Byington is moving his dairy operation and a large number of his cattle out of Winona County, saying the county's animal unit cap played a significant factor in his leaving after moving to the farm south of Lewiston five years ago. (Brian Todd/btodd@postbulletin.com)
Dairy cows get loaded onto a trailer headed to Colorado Thursday, April 8, 2021, south of Lewiston. Parker Byington is moving his dairy operation and a large number of his cattle out of Winona County, saying the county's animal unit cap played a significant factor in his leaving after moving to the farm south of Lewiston five years ago. (Brian Todd/btodd@postbulletin.com)

With a big portion of his herd packed into livestock trailers, Parker Byington said goodbye to Winona County Thursday, looking forward to what he hopes are more welcoming pastures in Colorado.

Byington, who until recently milked 660 head of cattle at his farm south of Lewiston on Interstate 90 and Wabasha County Road 14, loaded 245 cows onto eight trailers and hauled the animals to their new home out west.

"We are moving west to further our career in dairy there," Byington said. "With the current regulations (in Winona County), we're not able to grow anymore."

Read the full story by Brian Todd here.


Gunfights, W.W. Mayo, Cut-Nose, the Brom murders: New book by Mayo doc explores Rochester's varied history

"Rochester stories, a Med City history." by Paul Scanlon M.D. (Contributed photo)
"Rochester stories, a Med City history." by Paul Scanlon M.D. (Contributed photo)

As an area history buff, Mayo Clinic's Dr. Paul Scanlon often finds himself buttonholed by colleagues and acquaintances with questions about the city's past.

Why was Mayo Clinic built in the middle of nowhere? What happened to the Native Americans who once populated Southern Minnesota? Why is the snag-filled river running through Rochester called the "Zumbro"? Of all the uninspired, common names, why is Rochester called Rochester?

More often than not, Scanlon has the answer.

Read the full story by Matthew Stolle here.


Brooklyn Center chief: Cop pulled gun not Taser, shot Daunte Wright by mistake (with video)

This still image was taken from Brooklyn Center Police body-worn camera footage showing the Sunday, April 11, 2021, incident that left one man dead. The footage was shown during a Monday, April 12, news conference.
This still image was taken from Brooklyn Center Police body-worn camera footage showing the Sunday, April 11, 2021, incident that left one man dead. The footage was shown during a Monday, April 12, news conference.

The police officer who fatally shot a 20-year-old Black man in Brooklyn Center, Minn., Sunday mistakenly fired her firearm, instead of her Taser, the suburb’s police chief said Monday.

In other words, Daunte Wright’s death was a mistake — “an accidental discharge,” according to statements made Monday, April 12, by Police Chief Tim Gannon, who played a portion of video recorded by the officer’s body camera at an afternoon news conference.

In the video, the officer can be heard warning Wright that she will tase him, then yelling “Taser! Taser! Taser!” as she draws her actual firearm and fires one shot before screaming “Holy sh–! I shot him!”

Read the full story here.