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BOX Benefit slated for owners of Beaver Trails

Spaghetti dinner and auction benefit

What: Benefit for local couple injured in RV accident.

When: 4 p.m. to midnight April 12.Where: Windmill Hotel banquet room in Dexter.

Why: To raise money for the Don Tolner Benefit Fund.

How much: Suggested donation is $10 per adult and $5 per child. Children ages 3 and under will be admitted for free.

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By Karen Colbenson

Post-Bulletin, Austin MN

An upcoming spaghetti dinner and auction will benefit a local couple severely injured in an RV accident earlier this year.

Don and Laura Tolner, who bought Beaver Trails Campground and RV Park last year, are still recovering from injuries after their motor home collided with a semitrailer Jan. 28 in Texas.

As a small business owner, Don Tolner was left with a gap in medical insurance at the time of the accident. A benefit fund Web site was created in an effort to help raise money for the Tolners’ skyrocketing medical expenses.

The public is invited to attend the local benefit, which will feature food and fun, including a spaghetti dinner, live and silent auctions and music from local band JukeBox Heroes.

Gusting winds blew the Tolners’ bus-sized motor home across the median of U.S. 77, causing a fiery head-on collision with the semi, according to the Corpus Christi Caller-Times newspaper in Texas.

The driver of the 18-wheeler was killed and found burned inside the truck.

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It is unknown who pulled the Tolners from their burning motor home.

A year ago, the Tolners bought Beaver Trails, on Interstate 90 several miles east of Austin, from longtime owners Bill and Carol Sheely.

The Tolners previously ran a marina campground for 12 years in Texas.

"We’re RVers at heart," Laura Tolner said in a January 2007 interview with the Austin Post-Bulletin. "This is a passion."

Donations are being accepted for the auction.

weblinks.

Don Tolner Benefit Fund

http://www.dontolner.org

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