ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Favre steps down after one of his finest years

Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. — Only two years removed from perhaps his worst season, Brett Favre had a resurgence in 2007. He broke several career records. Among them was Dan Marino’s career mark for career touchdown passes. He powered the Packers to an NFC North title and a 13-3 regular-season record and earned his ninth Pro Bowl spot.

Surrounded by an underrated group of wide receivers who proved hard to tackle after the catch, Favre had a career-high completion percentage of 66.5. He threw for 4,155 yards, 28 touchdowns and only 15 interceptions.

It was a remarkable turnaround from 2005, Favre’s final season under former head coach Mike Sherman, when he threw a career-worst 29 interceptions as the Packers went 4-12.

But Favre finished the season on a sour note, suddenly showing his age in the Packers’ 23-20 overtime loss to the New York Giants in the NFC Championship game.

ADVERTISEMENT

Favre struggled in subzero temperatures, throwing an interception on the Packers’ second play from scrimmage in overtime to set up the Giants’ game-winning field goal.

After that game, Favre was noncommittal on his future. McCarthy said he wanted Favre to take a step back from the season before making a decision. But it was widely assumed he would be back.

"I think he’s going to come back," Packers receiver Donald Driver said in early January.

"I wouldn’t be surprised if he comes back. He’s having a great year, so it’d be great to see him come back if he decides to."

Retiring Packers chairman Bob Harlan figured Favre would be back, too.

"Yeah, I think he’ll be back," Harlan said, on his final official day as the Packers’ top executive. "And I felt that way the last couple years, when we’ve had these long debates about it. I just think he’s such a competitor that as long as he feels he can compete, he’s going to keep coming back."

Still, in the week leading to the playoff game against Seattle, Favre said his injuries were starting to linger.

"I’m not getting any younger," Favre said. "I wake up some days and think I can’t even touch my toes. I think about that. I think, well, next year is not going to be like some refreshing, awakening season where all of a sudden you’re going to feel great. That’s not going to happen.’’

What To Read Next
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.