The Rochester City Council will continue exploring options for funding city park improvements Monday.

The city’s 2016 Parks and Recreation System Plan identified more than $80 million in potential improvements, based on increased demand and proposed upgrades.

The city’s Park Board, with the support of the city council, enlisted the Trust for Public Land last year to evaluate finance options for the improvements, and the trust’s feasibility study points to three primary options -- borrowing, increasing the property tax levy or imposing a special sales tax.

“Since most new funding options would require voter approval, Rochester should narrow the potential funding options to those that match the needs identified in the city’s planning processes,” the feasibility study states, suggesting the use of an opinion survey to gauge support.

The survey would help the council determine whether to put a question on the Nov. 3 ballot to seek the added funding. A decision on a ballot question would need to be made by Aug. 21.

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According to the trust, the city could borrow $40 million through general obligation bonds for park projects. The move would add $2.4 million to the city’s annual debt payments, costing owners of median-valued homes an average of $30 per year in property taxes for 30 years.

The city council could increase the property tax levy without voter support through the standard budget process or it could seek a voter referendum.

As an example, the trust indicated a $2 million levy increase would cost the median household an additional $25 per year in property taxes if approved without voter support. Alternatively, the same increase through a voter-approved levy increase would cost the same homeowner an additional $33 per year in property taxes.

Another option would include seeking legislative support for a dedicated local sales tax, which would also need voter approval. Under that option, an additional local sales tax of 15 percent could generate more than $3.7 million annually and cost the typical household $26 per year.

The Rochester City Council will review potential next steps during its study session at 3:30 p.m. Monday in council chambers. The meeting will livestream at www.rochestermn.gov/agendas and available on Spectrum cable channel 180 or 188.

UPCOMING MEETINGS

Meetings held with remote access during the week of June 22 include:

Rochester

• City Council study session, 3:30 p.m. Monday in the council chambers of the city-county Government Center, 151 Fourth St. SE. The meeting will livestream at www.rochestermn.gov/agendas and available on Spectrum cable channel 180 or 188.

• Heritage Preservation Commission, 5 p.m. Tuesday in council chambers. The meeting will livestream at www.rochestermn.gov/agendas.he meeting will livestream at www.rochestermn.gov/agendas and be available on Spectrum cable channel 180 or 188.

• Public Utility Board, 4 p.m.

• Rochester-Olmsted Council of Governments, noon Wednesday with members participating via Skype. An audio recording of the meeting is expected to be available after the meeting on the ROCOG website.

• Planning and Zoning Commission, 6 p.m. Wednesday in the council chambers of the Government Center. The meeting will livestream at www.rochestermn.gov/agendas, and the city’s planning department is providing a call-in number for people who want to participate in the public hearing.

Olmsted County

• Rochester-Olmsted Council of Governments, noon Wednesday with members participating via Skype. An audio recording of the meeting is expected to be available after the meeting on the ROCOG website.

• Soil and Water Conservation District Board, 8 a.m. Thursday. Meeting is being held via Skype, with details posted at http://olmstedcountymn.iqm2.com/