ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Hagedorn votes no in election certification

Says his vote was about the constitutionality of election law changes.

102420.N.RPB.LEWIS.HAGEDORN.03494.jpg
U.S. Rep. Jim Hagedorn, who is running for re-election, speaks during a campaign event Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, at the Rochester Trump Victory Office. (Joe Ahlquist / jahlquist@postbulletin.com)

WASHINGTON — A violent mob halted the congressional debate over certification of the Electoral College votes in the 2020 presidential election. But within hours, both the Senate and House of Representatives were back to work and early Thursday morning, the election of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as president and vice president was certified.

Rep. Jim Hagedorn and newly elected Rep. Michelle Fischbach were the only Minnesota Republicans to object to counting the votes from Arizona and Pennsylvania. In a statement, Hagedorn said he was concerned about the constitutionality of election law changes.

“In the closing months of the presidential race, partisan government officials and courts, often at the behest of organized liberal activists, amended or suspended election laws and voting procedures in several key states, and did so without approval from state legislatures,” Hagedorn said. “These unilateral and unconstitutional actions, influenced the outcomes of elections, called into question the integrity of the 2020 presidential election and needlessly created a constitutional crisis.”

In the statement, Hagedorn said his votes were intended to “encourage state legislatures to reclaim their authority and restore election integrity.”

Rep. Hagedorn's full release:

WASHINGTON – Congressman Jim Hagedorn (MN-01) tonight voted to object to the counting of Electoral College votes for the State of Arizona and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the only disputed slates of electors considered and voted upon by the U.S. House and Senate.

ADVERTISEMENT

Hagedorn cited concerns about the constitutionality of individual actors in various states making wholesale changes to election laws without the consent of respective state legislatures, as is required under the United States Constitution.

“In the closing months of the presidential race, partisan government officials and courts, often at the behest of organized liberal activists, amended or suspended election laws and voting procedures in several key states, and did so without approval from state legislatures. These unilateral and unconstitutional actions, influenced the outcomes of elections, called into question the integrity of the 2020 presidential election and needlessly created a constitutional crisis.

“We must shine a light on the unilateral actions of state officials and courts, who subverted the proper authority of state legislatures to change election laws. For our republic and the Electoral College process to properly function, the U.S. Constitution must be respected.

“My votes today are intended to encourage state legislatures to reclaim their authority and restore election integrity. Moving forward, Electoral College inequities must be addressed in a timely fashion by state legislatures, and, when necessary, the U.S. Supreme Court.

“Lastly, I continue to advocate for a commission, created by Congress and comprised of House, Senate and Supreme Court members, to perform a forensic audit of the 2020 presidential election,” said Hagedorn.

What To Read Next
Caitlin and Jason Keck’s two-year term on the American Farm Bureau Federation committee begins next month.
The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission met on Jan. 5, 2023, to consider the application for Summit Carbon Solutions.
Qualified Minnesota farmers will receive dollar-for-dollar matching money to purchase farmland.
Wanda Patsche, new Farm Camp director, has farmed with her husband near I-90 in southern Minnesota since the 1970s and shares her passion for farming on her blog.