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LET Reservations are still bad idea

The answer to the chronic problems on Indian reservations such as Leech Lake is not building new treatment centers or expanding the Boys and Girls Club, or teaching the Ojibwe history and traditions. The answer is to shut down the reservations, equitably distribute the reservation resources among the Indians, and integrate the tribes into the mainstream of the U.S.

Reservations were a bad idea when they were formed and they are a bad idea now.

This country is not one of tribes but a blend of people, and encouraging Indians to remain on reservations just because their forefathers were Indians is the biggest injustice of all. For most of the youth, there is no future on the reservation. Hunting, fishing and living off the land are no longer viable ways to support a family, and casinos are nothing but Band-Aids where a few get rich and others have nothing. Is it surprising that the youth are discouraged and feel hopeless?

If leaders would encourage young Indians to get an education and leave the reservation, many of the chronic problems would get resolved. Their pride will be restored when they have a promising and meaningful future. The reservations cannot provide that.

Indians don't have to give up their culture, but if they continue to try living in the past, today's problems will never go away. Move off and move on.

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Ted; Clikeman

Rochester;

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