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Potential Rochester and Olmsted County property tax levies set for review

City and county officials must cap potential property taxes set to be collected in 2023 as budget discussions continue.

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ROCHESTER — The city of Rochester and Olmsted County will set maximum property tax levies for 2023 next week.

The Rochester City Council is slated to consider a 6.85% increase, which relates to the overall amount of property taxes collected in a year.

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City and county officials are quick to note that the tax levy increase isn’t directly related to the increase property owners will see, since changes in market values of individual properties also affect the final tax bill.

For Rochester, the proposed tax levy would generate nearly $92.8 million for an anticipated $588.3 million budget. It’s an approximately $6 million increase in overall property tax revenue.

Key factors discussed as the council approached the recommended levy were added funds for a human resources position, increasing travel and training budgets for city staff and elected officials, and funds needed to transition heating and cooling operations for downtown city buildings.

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The proposal will be discussed during the council’s regular meeting at 7 p.m. Monday in council chambers of the city-county Government Center, 151 Fourth St. SE.

The City Council, along with the Olmsted County Board of Commissioners, are required to establish a maximum potential property tax levy by the end of September. The amount collected next year could decrease from that amount, but it can’t increase.

Capping the amount of potential property taxes sets a target for continued budget discussions as both bodies work to finalize 2023 spending plans.

Olmsted County commissioners are slated to consider a maximum levy amount during their regular meeting at 3 p.m. Tuesday in board chambers of the Government Center. However, a specific target has not yet been released.

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This year’s property tax levy was $116.8 million for a $281.9 million budget.

With the preliminary tax levies to be set next week, the Rochester City Council and Olmsted County commissioners are expected to hold public hearings related to their final 2023 budgets and tax levies in early December.



Upcoming meetings

Meetings scheduled to be held during the week of Sept. 19 include:

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Rochester

  • City Council study session, 3:30 p.m. Monday In council chambers of the city-county Government Center, 151 Fourth St. SE. The meeting will livestream at www.rochestermn.gov/meetings/council-meetings and be available on Spectrum cable channel 180 or 188 and Metronet channel 80.
  • Energy Commission study session, 4 p.m. Monday online, with access information available at http://rochestercitymn.iqm2.com/Citizens/Default.aspx
  • City Council, 7 p.m. Monday in council chambers of the Government Center. The meeting will livestream at www.rochestermn.gov/meetings/council-meetings and be available on Spectrum cable channel 180 or 188 and Metronet channel 80.
  • Park Board public hearing, 6 p.m. Tuesday in room 101 of the Mayo Civic Center, 30 Civic Center Drive SE.
  • Ethical Practices Board, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in room 104 of City Hall, 201 Fourth St. SE.
  • Library Board, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday in meeting room C of the Rochester Public Library, 101 Second St. SE.
  • Zoning Board of Appeals, 6 p.m. Wednesday in council chambers of the Government Center.

Olmsted County 

  • Health, Housing and Human Services Committee, 11 a.m. Tuesday in conference room 2 for the city-county Government Center.
  • Housing and Redevelopment Authority Board, 1 p.m. Tuesday in board chambers of the Government Center.
  • Physical Development Committee, 2 p.m. Tuesday in conference room 2 for the city-county Government Center.
  • Board of County Commissioners, 3 p.m. Tuesday in the board chambers of the Government Center.
  • Parks Commission, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Chester Woods Park, 8378 Highway 14 East, in Eyota.
  • Environmental Commission, 7:15 p.m. Wednesday at Environmental Services, 2122 Campus Drive SE in Rochester.

Rochester Public Schools

  • School Board, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the boardroom of the Edison Building, 615 Seventh St. SW.

Destination Medical Center

  • DMC Corp. board, 9:30 a.m. Thursday in suite 106 of the Mayo Civic Center, 30 Civic Center Drive SE.
Randy Petersen joined the Post Bulletin in 2014 and became the local government reporter in 2017. An Elkton native, he's worked for a variety of Midwest papers as reporter, photographer and editor since graduating from Winona State University in 1996. Readers can reach Randy at 507-285-7709 or rpetersen@postbulletin.com.
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