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MnDOT seeks submissions for annual Name a Snowplow contest

Past contests have yielded such clever names as “Ctrl Salt Delete” and “Snowbi Wan Kenobi,” or a nod to Minnesota native Prince with “The Truck Formerly Known As Plow.”

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MnDOT plows clear snow from Interstate 494 in Inver Grove Heights as a winter storm hit southern Minnesota on Dec. 10, 2021. MnDOT is accepting submissions for its "Name-a-Snowplow" contest.
Andrew Krueger | MPR News 2021
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ST. PAUL — The Minnesota Department of Transportation is accepting submissions once again for its popular annual Name a Snowplow contest.

Officials are asking Minnesotans for their “most witty, unique and Minnesota- or winter-themed name submissions” for a plow in each of MnDOT’s eight districts across Minnesota.

Past contests have yielded such clever names as “Ctrl Salt Delete” and “Snowbi Wan Kenobi,” or a nod to Minnesota native Prince with “The Truck Formerly Known As Plow.”

MnDOT is accepting submissions on its website until Friday, Dec. 16. There are a few rules for the contest:

  • One name submission per person.
  • Names must be 30 characters or less.
  • No submissions with vulgar or profane language.
  • Political names will not be accepted.
  • No repeats of past winners.

Transportation department staff will review the names, select their favorite ideas and invite the public to vote on the finalists in January. Last year, the agency received more than 22,000 name ideas and whittled the list to 50 top picks to put to a public vote.
Their criteria for the finalists included uniqueness, creativity, frequency of submission, and whether the name would be understandable to a broad part of the public. MnDOT announced its eight picks from the December 2021 contest in early February.

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For a complete list of past winners, visit the MnDOT Name a Snowplow contest website.

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