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Pecinovsky expects good yields with great variability

By Jean Caspers-Simmet

simmet@agrinews.com

NASHUA, Iowa — Ken Pecinovsky, superintendent of the Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm at Nashua, told farmers at last week’s fall field day that he expects some good yields, but they may be variable.

Weather presented challenges. Rainfall at the research farm was 8.94 inches for April, 5.59 above the 30-year average. May rainfall was 4.33, 0.14 inches below the 30-year-average.

"Just six to seven miles south of here, they were waiting a week and a half after we were done to plant," Pecinovsky said.

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June rainfall was 9.38, 4.31 inches above the 30-year average.

"That seems like a lot, but some guys got eight inches in a couple days," Pecinovsky said. "It could have been a lot worse."

Rainfall for July was 5.96 inches, 1.21 above normal. Rainfall in August was 1.42 inches, 3.57 below the 30-year average. Rainfall so far this season has been 30.03, with the 30-year average from April to November 30.28 inches.

"And we’ve got a couple months to go yet," Pecinovsky said.

Rainfall for 2007 was 34 inches. It was 42.34 in 1999 and 46.86 in 1993, two other wet years.

Temperatures in April and May were 1.67 and 1.74 degrees below normal, Pecinovsky said. June and July were 0.27 and 0.83 degrees above normal. August was 0.59 degrees below normal. For the season, Nashua is 175 growing degree units behind normal.

The farm was 70 growing degree units ahead of normal in 2007. It was 122 below normal in 1999 and 118 behind in 1993, two wet and cold years.

Pecinovsky said that 98-day corn planted April 16 is fully dented. The 111-day corn planted April 16 is 80 percent dented.

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The 98-day corn planted April 30 is 90 percent dented as is the 98-day corn planted May 13. The 111-day corn planted April 30 is 60 percent dented. The 111-day corn planted May 13 is 50 percent dented. The 98-day corn planted May 8 is 80 percent dented. The 111-day corn planted May 25 is 2 percent dented. The 98-day corn planted June 8 is R4 to dough stage and the 111-day corn is R3 to milk stage.

Corn planted April 16 and April 30 silked July 25 to July 28. Corn planted May 13 silked July 28 to August 1. Corn planted May 25 silked Aug. 1 to 5, and the corn hybrids planted June 11 silked Aug. 11 to 15.

The milk line on fully dented corn should move down 1/4 way per week so it’s at least three more weeks until black layer, at which it will be frost safe, Pecinovsky said.

For soybeans, the 1.9 relative maturity beans planted April 16 are 10 days from maturity. The 2.9 relative maturity beans planted April 16 are about 26 days from maturity. The 1.9 beans planted April 30 are 10 to 26 days from maturity. The 2.9 beans planted April 30 are 26 days from maturity. The 1.9 beans planted May 13 are 26 days from maturity and the 2.9 beans, 26 to 42 days from maturity. The 1.9 and 2.9 relative maturity beans planted May 25 and June 11 are 26 to 42 days from maturity.

Last year, the first frost at Nashua came Sept. 15. A typical first frost date is Oct. 4.

Pecinovsky said the farm started harvesting soybeans Sept. 14 and corn Sept. 29 last year. In wet and cold 1993, soybean harvest started Oct. 7 and corn harvest Oct. 25.

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