ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Readers respond — Can tolerance be taught?

Each week we select a news story, column or letter to the editor that’s generated a lot of discussion at Postbulletin.com and reprint some of those reader comments here.

This week’s topic is a news story in Tuesday’s edition about a Rochester Diversity Council survey that reveals racial perceptions.

Here are some of the responses to that article:

"Sometimes racism and reality can be confused. Numbers and statistics don’t lie. They are used in education, history and government. No one wants to be considered a racist but they should have the right to criticize others for their lack of effort to assimilate into a society that puts value on things they feel are important to their well being. Many statistics do not bear well for the newcomers in Rochester. I hope the council would look to improve those efforts among these newcomers and not just condemn those of us who object to their faults. Although no one is without faults, if everyone showed some consideration for each other certain minor things could be overlooked."

———

ADVERTISEMENT

"I do always like to know how my tax money and donations are being used. Going to the Diversity Council Web site, I find donated government dollars are $86,550. Costs of the group for celebrations are $21,845, fundraising is $36,606, management is $31,434 and support is $68,041. Is the Diversity Council accomplishing their mission and are they cost-effective? Would the same money spent differently provide better results?"

———

"This is really more of an indictment against the Diversity Council than against the community … for 10 years they’ve received more than adequate funding and here we are almost three times worse with our opinions on diversity. Exactly what is it that they do besides petition the local government and school district for funding — sponsor a few ‘white privilege’ classes which make an affluent Caucasian feel good about trying a new ‘exotic’ meal but hardly motivates them to leave their gated community for a diverse experience in Homestead Village."

———

"Maybe the people who did not respond could not read the survey because it was not in their native language. I think the people responding were a fair representation of how the majority of Rochester residents feel. I know all the do gooders will chastise me for my comments but that is how I and apparently many others feel."

"Everybody has had sooo much diversity education. How about some assimilation education for those that need it!"

———

"...Racism is blindly hating a class of people for their race. Hating the behavior of people is NOT racism. I agree ... that money would be best spent teaching ALL newcomers to Rochester how to behave properly. If not, hire more cops and build more jail cells!"

ADVERTISEMENT

———

"Education is the answer. How do people move in society now? Good jobs which pay good salaries... Let's support education, families and programs that directly impact the daily lives of families. Example: the Boys and Girls Club... Kids I know, worked one and two jobs, studied hard, went to college (sometimes taking time off to get more money) and now they are working in professional jobs. And they started only with determination and a dream of where they wanted their life to go."

What To Read Next
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.