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Rochester woman charged with telling son to lie about abduction attempt

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Rochester woman charged with telling son to lie about abduction attempt

By Janice Gregorson

gregor@postbulletin.com

A call about an attempted child abduction has led to criminal charges against a Rochester woman, who is accused of getting children to lie in order to get a man she dislikes arrested.

Sara Monsour Fatain, 36, 4417 10th St. N.W., is charged with gross misdemeanor contributing to the delinquency of a child, gross misdemeanor harassment-stalking, and misdemeanor falsely reporting a crime, all on Dec. 19, 2008.

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A summons has been issued for her to be in Olmsted District Court on April 6.

Police were called to the Fatain residence on a report of an attempted child abduction Dec. 19. The caller said someone in a gold van tried to pull a 12-year-old boy into the vehicle. Police noted they had several recent prior contacts at the Fatain address about conflicts between Fatain and a man. She had accused him of various crimes and requested he be arrested. The complaint said officers had been unable to find evidence to support her claims.

On Dec. 19, police saw several children walking on the sidewalk toward the residence, but made no attempt to signal the officer as he drove by. Fatain said she did not make the call. Her son, who had been walking with the group, arrived home. He said that his friend had called the police for him. He said the man had tried to pull him into his van while he was walking with his friends. Fatain told police that the man used to be a family friend and that he was a "very bad man for trying to take her son." She said she wanted the man arrested, the complaint says.

When police questioned the boy further, he became nervous when asked to provide more detail about the alleged abduction attempt. The officer had the boy take him to the location where the incident occurred. Police said it had been snowing heavily that day, and there were no vehicle tracks in the snow near the curb where the boy said the incident occurred. The officer did not see any tracks in the snow consistent with someone being dragged or to indicate that a struggle had occurred. He said all of the tracks appeared to be walking tracks toward the boy’s home.

Police then talked to two neighbor girls who had been with Fatain’s son. They said Fatain told them to lie about what happened. They said that they had been at Fatain’s home earlier, and that she told them how bad the man was and how she wanted him to go to jail.

The 12-year-old boy then admitted to police that he lied about the gold van and the attempted abduction, the complaint says.

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