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Far-right Bolsonaro supporters invade Brazil presidential palace, Congress, Supreme Court

The sight of thousands of yellow-and-green clad protesters running riot in the capital capped months of tension following the Oct. 30 vote.

Supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro demonstrate against President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, in Brasilia
Supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro charge into the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil, on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2023.
Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters
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BRASILIA, Brazil -- Supporters of Brazil's far-right former President Jair Bolsonaro on Sunday invaded the country's Congress, presidential palace and Supreme Court, in a grim echo of the U.S. Capitol invasion two years ago by fans of former President Donald Trump.

Leftist President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who defeated Bolsonaro in the most fraught election in a generation last year, announced a federal security intervention in Brasilia lasting until Jan. 31 after capital security forces initially were overwhelmed by the invaders.

In a press conference, he blamed Bolsonaro and complained about a lack of security in the capital, saying authorities had allowed "fascists" and "fanatics" to wreak havoc.

"These vandals, who we could call fanatical Nazis, fanatical Stalinists ... fanatical fascists, did what has never been done in the history of this country," said Lula, who was on an official trip to Sao Paulo state. "All these people who did this will be found and they will be punished."

The sight of thousands of yellow-and-green clad protesters running riot in the capital capped months of tension following the Oct. 30 vote. Bolsonaro, an acolyte of Trump's who has yet to concede defeat, peddled the false claim that Brazil's electronic voting system was prone to fraud, spawning a violent movement of election deniers.

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There was no immediate word from Bolsonaro, who has barely spoken in public since losing the election. He flew to Florida 48 hours before the end of his mandate and was absent from Lula's inauguration.

"This genocidist ... is encouraging this via social media from Miami," Lula said, referring to Bolsonaro. "Everybody knows there are various speeches of the ex-president encouraging this."

The violence in Brasilia could amplify the legal risks Bolsonaro faces. It also presents a headache for U.S authorities as they debate how to handle his stay in Florida.

Supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro demonstrate against President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, in Brasilia
Security forces detain supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro after they stormed government buildings Sunday, Jan. 8, 2023, in Brasilia, Brazil.
Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters

The Bolsonaro family lawyer, Frederick Wassef, did not respond to a request for comment.

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Around 6.30 p.m. local time, some three hours after the initial reports of the invasion, security forces managed to retake the three buildings, GloboNews reported. TV images showed dozens of rioters being led away in handcuffs.

The invasions were condemned by leaders around the world.

President Joe Biden, whose own presidency was marked by a similar event, said the situation was "outrageous." His Secretary of State Antony Blinken offered Washington's full support to Lula and Brazil's institutions.

"Using violence to attack democratic institutions is always unacceptable," Blinken wrote on Twitter. "We join Lula in urging an immediate end to these actions."

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The invasion poses an immediate problem for Lula, who was only inaugurated on Jan. 1 and has pledged to unite a nation torn apart by Bolsonaro's nationalist populism. Television images showed protesters breaking into the Supreme Court and Congress, chanting slogans and smashing furniture. Local media estimated about 3,000 people were involved.

The Supreme Court, whose crusading Justice Alexandre de Moraes has been a thorn in the side of Bolsonaro and his supporters, was ransacked by the occupiers, according to social media images that showed protesters clubbing security cameras and shattering the windows of the modernist building.

Brasilia Gov. Ibaneis Rocha wrote on Twitter that he had fired his top security official, Anderson Torres, previously Bolsonaro's justice minister. The solicitor general's office said it had filed a request for Torres' arrest.

Torres told website UOL that he was with his family on holiday in the United States, and had not met with Bolsonaro. UOL said he was in Orlando, where Bolsonaro is currently based.

Supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro demonstrate against President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, in Brasilia
Supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro outside the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil, on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2023.
Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters
Supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro demonstrate against President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, in Brasilia
Supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro vandalize a room in Planalto Palace on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2022.
Adriano Machado / Reuters

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Related Topics: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
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