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YOU ASKED COLUMN Whatever happened to the giant steel polyp sculpture that was in front of the Mayo Civic Center earlier this year?

The prominent polyp was parked in front of the civic center during the Cancer Prevention Family Health Fair in March, courtesy of the Minnesota Colon and Rectal Foundation.

The sculpture was intended to be an eye-catcher for the fair, and it sure did that. It was an abstract but recognizable portrait of a colon polyp being surgically removed with a snare.

If that didn't motivate you to think about having a colonoscopy, I can give you other reasons. Send me an e-mail and I'll provide links.

The sculpture, by Minneapolis artist Zoran Mojsilov, is now back in his studio. "Zoran very much hopes a doctor will see the value and beauty of his work and will want to purchase it," says Cindy Iverson, director of the colon foundation. For details, call her at (651) 312-1524.

FYI, the sculpture was the brainchild of Dr. Paul Limburg, a gastroenterologist at Mayo who was co-chair of the health fair.

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What's going on at West Circle Drive at U.S. 14, across from Kwik Trip? That property was for sale forever but now I hear there's yet another bank building planned there. -- Mike

You can take it to the bank, Mike -- Olmsted National Bank will move its main office to a new four-story building at that site. Site preparation is now being done, and construction will start soon. Olmsted's one-and-only office at 120 Elton Hills Drive N.W. will become a branch office when the new building's ready, probably early in 2006.

Lyman Grieve, president and CEO, says the bank will be a tenant in the new building. No details on other tenants yet.

Olmsted National Bank opened in May 1996 and since '03 has been 100-percent locally owned, says Grieve. The bank has total assets of about $53 million.

RESTAURANT MERRY-GO-ROUND: Even Jerry Reising, the newsroom's hoary keeper of Rochester area history, couldn't come up with an answer to this query:

"In the mid-1960s there was a restaurant in the alley across Second Street Southwest from Rochester Junior College, which was housed at that time in the Coffman Building. My wife and I and two old JC friends ate there often, but none of us seems certain about the name of the place, which incidentally had wonderful raspberry pie. Can you help? -- Ralph, Kathy, Donna and John."

Tell me and I'll pass it along. Better yet, if you have the recipe for that raspberry pie, I'll take it.

BEST BURGER: The Paris Hilton item in Thursday's column, which drew attention to Carl's Jr. burgers, prompted this note from Kevin about another expensive hamburger that you can't buy in the Rochester area:

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"The best fast-food hamburger in Southern California is not Carl's Jr., but In-N-Out Burger. Despite the name, it usually ranks near the top in burger satisfaction surveys. There are stores in California, Nevada and Arizona."

The Web site's at in-n-out.com.

The name In-N-Out does raise questions about how long the burger stays in your system, however.

In go the questions and out come the facts. Send questions to furst@postbulletin.com or P.O. Box 6118, Rochester, MN 55904.

Want to hand-deliver your question to the Answer Man? He'll be at Buffalo Wild Wings, near Wal-Mart North in Rochester, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, June 9. Ask for him at the front counter and you'll be directed to his table.

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