SUBSCRIBE NOW AND SAVE 3 months just 99¢/month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Angry birds: Humane Society frees fighting eagles in La Crosse

LA CROSSE, Wis. — Workers at a Wisconsin Humane Society have rescued two male eagles entangled in a turf war. Humane Society supervisor Kathy KasaKaitas said the raptors are territorial and one had apparently invaded the other's air space....

eaglerescue.jpg
Animal control officer Kathy KasaKaitas releases an eagle in Pierce Park in Onalaska, Wis. Wednesday.. The eagle was one of two eagles that were separated during a fight Tuesday.

LA CROSSE, Wis. — Workers at a Wisconsin Humane Society have rescued two male eagles entangled in a turf war.

Humane Society supervisor Kathy KasaKaitas said the raptors are territorial and one had apparently invaded the other's air space. KasaKaitas and animal control officer Lucas Brennan became referees in the eagles' fight in an Onalaska neighborhood Tuesday. The eagles began scuffling in the air, then landed together on the ground.

KasaKaitas and Brennan had the dicey task of separating the birds' entangled talons without getting hurt themselves.

"They're strong," KasaKaitas said. "Their feet basically lock on. We were concerned that, if their talons grabbed one of our arms or legs, it would have caused a severe injury."

Unable to get a gloved hand between the birds, the two used a screwdriver to pry the claws apart.

ADVERTISEMENT

"As we got one foot released, we wanted the eagle to hold on to something so it couldn't regrab while we worked on the other one," KasaKaitas said.

They coaxed one eagle into latching onto the screwdriver handle instead of slicing into his adversary — or them.

After the eagles calmed down, they were taken to the society's headquarters. One was given antibiotics for its injuries. The other, apparently the aggressor, appeared unscathed, KasaKaitas said.

Both birds were released Wednesday.

Related Topics: CRIME
What to read next
While social and emotional impacts on students have been a concern throughout the pandemic, staff at Wadena-Deer Creek Schools in Minnesota have worked on mental health and trauma-informed school training for about four years. The elementary school added Mary Ellenson as student success coordinator at the start of this school year, along with morning meetings and additional curriculum to create common vocabulary, unity and encourage discussion about emotions.
The pandemic has changed nursing, raising questions about the future of nursing and most immediately, who wants to even be a nurse. This crisis in nursing is causing nursing educators to quickly rethink how they train their students and making health systems rethink how they recruit and retain nurses.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack hears from a reader who needs advice on how to handle a grandmother's difficult personality.
When the days get shorter, people with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) may begin to struggle. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams talks to a University of Minnesota psychologist about how to cope if you have symptoms of this depressive disorder.