ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Answer Man: Air dancers perform on RPU water towers

Air dancer is fan of Answer Man
Does the air dancer (not pictured above) on the Apache Mall water tower really say, "Read the Answer Man every day"? Get out your binoculars and find out.
We are part of The Trust Project.

Oh Great Mystery Solver, my wife and I are dying to know -- who put the sky dancer on top of the Apache Mall water tower? He's been up there doing his jig for about a month now and we can't be the only ones who have noticed the bright red being. -- MCMT3021

Please don't die to know -- just read my column every single day and you won't miss vital information of this kind. As my most loyal readers know, I wrote about this on Aug. 31 of last year , and I remember it like it was yesterday. That loose-limbed fellow high above Apache Mall was put up there by Rochester Public Utilities. It's their water tower and they don't like turkey vultures circling and roosting up there. They cause a big mess that spills down the sides of the tower, causing an unsightly and costly mess.

RPU tried the "air dancer," as it's more often called, last year and it apparently did the trick. They also had one on the tower in Baihly Heights last year. Those two towers are defended by air dancers again this year, and next week RPU will add one to the St. Bridget's Road area tower. The happy dancers are taken down when the vulture season is over, in the fall.

As I've previously noted, wouldn't you think air dancers could be part of the solution for our downtown crows? I propose a few atop parking ramps, maybe atop the Old City Hall condos, maybe the Tap House and Grand Rounds. They can't hurt, and they're charming in their own way.

FYI, if you look very closely, the air dancer on the Apache Mall tower may say, "Read the Answer Man every day."

ADVERTISEMENT

Dear Answer Man, your Friday column describing 37th Street Northwest as like a roller-coaster ride is way off the mark. It's like travelling on railroad ties…bumpity-bumpity-bump. A roller-coaster has smooth rolling ups and downs. And canoeing on Lake Superior is nothing like 37th Street, either. Over 10 years ago there was a section of West River Parkway that was a roller-coaster ride and finally it was fixed. I certainly hope the up-coming repairs fix this annoying problem. -- Josie

I stand corrected.

Dear Answer Man, what is your guesstimate as to when the new Hy-Vee in Savage will be open for business?

I don't engage in guesstimates -- you'll find only facts here (including the fact that the problem on 37th Street by Hy-Vee is more like a roller-coaster ride). And Savage is a long way from most of my print readers, but I pursued this anyway for my worldwide audience.

Hy-Vee spokeswoman Tara Deering-Hansensays it's tentatively set to open next spring.

In case you're wondering, Hy-Vee is also looking at a Shakopee store as part of its full-bore move into the Twin Cities market. That store location is pending, Tara says: "Our goal is to purchase the property in early fall. However, we do not have a definitive timeline on when construction will start nor do we have a tentative store opening date."

At latest count, Hy-Vee has eight stores either up and running or on the drawing board for the Twin Cities.

What to read next
The largest U.S. home infusion pharmacy firm with locations in every state recently added Rochester Home Infusion to its team.
For decades, the drug industry has yelled bloody murder each time Congress considered a regulatory measure that threatened its profits. But the hyperbole reached a new pitch in recent weeks as the Senate moved to adopt modest drug pricing negotiation measures in the Inflation Reduction Act.
Sanford Health’s Program for Addiction Recovery provided Tanner Lene a way to connect to a heritage he’d left largely unexplored, as he began to learn Ojibwe and join classes taught by elders and knowledge keepers on traditional medicines and art.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack says distance makes keeping track of your parents' health harder, but barring dementia, they get to choose where they live.