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Austin Gold Cross ambulance station breaks ground

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Design rendering of the 7,600-square-foot Austin Gold Cross ambulance facility.

AUSTIN — The site of a new Gold Cross ambulance facility in Austin broke ground Friday.

The future facility at 18th Avenue and Fifth Street Northwest is a collaboration between the city of Austin and Mayo Clinic.

"As Austin and corresponding needs for emergency medical services continue to grow, Gold Cross will be able to respond to increasing call volumes and continue to serve the needs of patients into the future," said Kristopher Keltgen, the Gold Cross operations manager and facilities project lead. "This project represents our commitment to best meet the current and future needs of patients and visitors to the region who may require emergency medical services."

With an estimated $2.2 million budget, the 7,600-square-foot project will include four drive-through ambulance bays, an educational training space, state-of-the-art technology infrastructure and environmentally and sustainability-friendly operations. The project will involve several local/regional contractors and building materials/supplies.

The current ambulance service area is at 1010 W. Oakland Ave., which is in a residential area and receives about 4,500 calls per year. The new location will be within five minutes of both Interstate 90 and U.S. Highway 218, providing increased access and speed in emergency responses.

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"It’s nice to have highway access and provide services to all parts of the area," Keltgen said. "The scale and scope of the project will allow us to grow for the future and meet other possible urgent needs."

The project is slated to be completed in January 2019.

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