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Body found near Duluth elementary school by students, staff

Parents of students at Lowell Elementary School were notified Friday morning that a group of students and teachers discovered a deceased individual in the woods near the school.

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Emergency responders walk away from the area where a group of Lowell Elementary School students and teachers discovered a dead body in the woods near the school Friday morning in Duluth. (Clint Austin / caustin@duluthnews.com)

DULUTH — Parents of students at Lowell Elementary School were notified Friday morning, Sept. 27, that a group of students and teachers discovered a deceased individual in the woods near the school.

The automated phone call received by parents said "the teacher immediately took the students back to school" and called the police. It also told parents that mental health professionals were being brought in to provide assistance and support to adults and children Friday.

Several chaplains and all Duluth school district social workers were on site Friday.

Duluth Police Chief Mike Tusken confirmed that students were told the body was a Halloween decoration by a teacher. A meeting for parents is being held at 10:15 a.m. Friday.

Duluth Police Department information officer Ingrid Hornibrook said the preliminary indications are that the incident was a suicide. It is an open and active investigation.

Related Topics: EDUCATIONMIKE TUSKEN
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