ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Cancer epidemiology lecture set for Mayo Clinic

126507989
Healthcare And Medicine
We are part of The Trust Project.

Mayo Clinic on Oct. 15  will host a lecture, "It Takes Two to Tango: Cancer Epidemiology, Molecular Biology, and Public Policy."

The speakers are Sam Zakhari and David Ozgo, from the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS).

The lecture will explore how the evolving fields of molecular pathologic epidemiology and genome-wide causation studies integrate information that leads to more exact determinations of the causes of cancer in individual patients.

Public policy decisions are often based on the belief that a casual link has been established between alcohol consumption and breast cancer. However, the research used to make that connection, and thus the related public policy, is based on often dubious studies that rely on self-reporting of alcohol use.

Zakhari is senior vice president for science at DISCUS and has 40 years of research experience in the fields of pharmacology, toxicology, biochemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, genetics and molecular biology. Ozgo is senior vice president and chief economist at DISCUS, and frequently testifies before legislative bodies on tax, regulatory and market-access issues.

ADVERTISEMENT

The lecture is at 7:30 p.m. in Geffen Auditorium of the Gonda Building.

Related Topics: MAYO CLINIC
What to read next
Experts warn that simply claiming the benefits may create paper trails for law enforcement officials in states criminalizing abortion. That will complicate life for the dozens of corporations promising to protect, or even expand, the abortion benefits for employees and their dependents.
Dear Mayo Clinic: I am 42 and recently was diagnosed with diabetes. My doctor said I could manage the condition with diet and exercise for now but suggested I follow up with a cardiologist. As far as I know, my heart is fine. What is the connection between diabetes and heart health?
In Minnesota, abortion is protected by the state’s constitution and is legal up to the point of viability, which is generally thought to begin at about 24 weeks, when the fetus can survive outside the womb. Those who work with Minnesotans who seek abortions say barriers, both legal and practical, forced some to travel to Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, Washington, D.C., and Wisconsin even prior to the Supreme Court’s decision.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist says it's important to remember that we can't "fix" aging for our parents, but we can listen with empathy and validate their feelings.