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Health Fusion: 3 tips for planting blueberry bushes

Research shows that if you grow some of your own fruits and vegetables, you're likely to eat more of them. In this episode of NewsMD's podcast, "Health Fusion," Viv Williams has three tips to help you grow your own blueberries.

Blueberries are one of my favorite fruits. The Blueberry Council website shows a cup is only 80 calories, low sodium, with manganese and vitamins C and K. Plus, they are full of fiber. Here are three tips to help you grow your own blueberry bushes:

  • Choose blueberry bushes that are hardy for where you live. Some varieties are specifically designed for colder climates.
  • Blueberry bushes need acidic soil. The ph should be between 4 and 5. You can lower soil ph by amending with sulphur, but that takes time. A quicker fix is to use sphagnum peat.
  • Blueberry bushes need a lot of sun

Talk to your local garden center about growing blueberries where you live.
Follow the Health Fusion podcast on Apple , Spotify , and Google Podcasts.

For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at vwilliams@newsmd.com . Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

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