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Library cancels 'Amuzing Race' event

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One RACE will be enough for the Rochester Public Library to run this summer. The library foundation announced Monday that it has canceled its annual Amuzing Race event in June.

This would have been the fourth year of the event, a fundraiser for the library's online homework assistance program. Instead, the library is concentrating on the exhibit "RACE: Are we so different?"

Many of the people who would normally volunteer for the Amuzing Race are acting as docents for the exhibit, which opened Monday and runs through Sept. 4, according to the library.

The Amuzing Race was an event designed to mimic the television show "The Amazing Race," in which teams of two to four people work together to solve clues sending them from one destination to the next.

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