ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Mayo Clinic donates another $500,000 to hurricane relief

We are part of The Trust Project.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic announced Monday that it donated $500,000 to relief efforts in Florida communities impacted by Hurricane Irma.

The donation was split evenly between the Florida First Coast Relief Fund and the American Red Cross. The Relief Fund is aimed at addressing needs in the Jacksonville community, where Mayo has a campus, and the surrounding communities. The Red Cross is assisting communities throughout Florida affected by the storm.

"We are saddened by the devastation and loss suffered by many people across Florida as a result of Hurricane Irma," said Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, a Mayo vice president who serves as CEO of its Florida campus. "We feel immense concern and commitment to helping address needs, especially in Northeast Florida, which is home to many members of our Mayo Clinic family."

Earlier this month, Mayo donated $500,000 to support Hurricane Harvey relief efforts in Texas. Other local companies and groups have done likewise, including a $500,000 donation from Red Wing Shoe Co.

In a written statement, Mayo said it "recognizes the urgent need for hope and assistance … and understands the responsibility to give back to those in need." It continues to work governmental and nongovernmental agencies and hasn't ruled out providing additional assistance in the form of equipment, supplies, personnel or funds.

ADVERTISEMENT

"We believe these financial contributions will best ensure that relief efforts contribute to the immediate, as well as long-term stability, of the affected areas," Dr. Farrugia said. "We extend our deepest sympathy to the millions who have been affected and to those within our Mayo community who have a personal connection from this disaster."

Related Topics: MAYO CLINIC
What to read next
The award will support research on how colorectal cancer spreads to the liver.
Bebtelovimab is designed as a treatment option for those newly diagnosed with COVID-19 who cannot take Paxlovid and are deemed at high risk of severe outcomes. It replaces a series of monoclonal treatments that no longer are effective against virus due to mutation.
The largest U.S. home infusion pharmacy firm with locations in every state recently added Rochester Home Infusion to its team.
For decades, the drug industry has yelled bloody murder each time Congress considered a regulatory measure that threatened its profits. But the hyperbole reached a new pitch in recent weeks as the Senate moved to adopt modest drug pricing negotiation measures in the Inflation Reduction Act.