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Mayo Clinic podcast: Tips to stay healthy while working from home

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Clayton Cowl, and Dr. Laura Breeher, a Mayo Clinic occupational medicine specialist, discuss tips and tricks for staying healthy while working from home.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has forced people to readjust in many ways, including some companies shifting to remote work. Working from a home office has its benefits, but it also comes with quite a few challenges. Virtual offices mean added screen time which can lead to eye strain, ear problems and too much time sitting in one place.

Living and working in the same space also can lead to challenges with setting boundaries and having an appropriate office space within the home.

"I think it's really important that if you are working from home, that you have office time and family time as separated as you can have," says Dr. Clayton Cowl , chair of the Division of Preventative, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine at Mayo Clinic. "And your home office needs to be a room — or at least a part of a room — where it's quiet, the light is appropriate, there's adequate ventilation, and it's set up ergonomically for you."

Occupational medicine is a specialty focused on helping workers stay at work and return to work.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Cowl and Dr. Laura Breeher , a Mayo Clinic occupational medicine specialist, discuss tips and tricks for staying healthy while working from home.

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