ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Mayo Clinic podcast: What happens after a prostate cancer diagnosis?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes discusses treatment options for prostate cancer and the latest in clinical trials and research.

Mayo podcast.jpg
Forum News Service illustration
We are part of The Trust Project.

After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men. One in 8 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime, according to the National Cancer Institute.

While some types of prostate cancer grow slowly, and may need minimal or even no treatment, other types are aggressive and can spread quickly.

So if you’ve been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Now what?

"It's very important to know the extent or stage of the cancer," says Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes , a Mayo Clinic urologist and chair of the Division of Community Urology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Diagnosis and staging are done using tests, including ultrasound, MRI and biopsy.

ADVERTISEMENT

Prostate cancer that's detected early — when it's still confined to the prostate gland — has the best chance for successful treatment. Prostate cancer treatment options depend on several factors, such as how fast the cancer is growing, whether it has spread, as well as the potential benefits or side effects of the treatment.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Karnes discusses treatment options for prostate cancer and the latest in clinical trials and research.

RELATED:

Related Topics: WELLNESSNEWSMDMAYO PODCASTS
What to read next
The largest U.S. home infusion pharmacy firm with locations in every state recently added Rochester Home Infusion to its team.
For decades, the drug industry has yelled bloody murder each time Congress considered a regulatory measure that threatened its profits. But the hyperbole reached a new pitch in recent weeks as the Senate moved to adopt modest drug pricing negotiation measures in the Inflation Reduction Act.
Sanford Health’s Program for Addiction Recovery provided Tanner Lene a way to connect to a heritage he’d left largely unexplored, as he began to learn Ojibwe and join classes taught by elders and knowledge keepers on traditional medicines and art.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack says distance makes keeping track of your parents' health harder, but barring dementia, they get to choose where they live.