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Mayo Clinic to join forces with Medica to form new insurance company

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"This expanded relationship will benefit not only both organizations, but also the people in the communities we serve," Medica CEO and President John Naylor said.
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Mayo Clinic is joining forces with Minnesota’s insurance giant Medica to offer health insurance nationally.

Customers will have access to Mayo Clinic’s care for serious conditions and illnesses, though local health care centers will provide the bulk of the services.

Medica has long worked with Mayo Clinic as an insurance network partner. Medica also purchased Mayo Clinic’s MMSI, Inc., health services business in 2017. MMSI, which does business as Mayo Clinic Health Solutions, will transition to Medica’s technology platform in 2019.

"This expanded relationship will benefit not only both organizations, but also the people in the communities we serve," Medica CEO and President John Naylor said in a prepared announcement.

Mayo Clinic also lauded the new arrangement.

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"Our relationship with Medica and future product offerings support a collaborative model of care delivery and coordination of services with better outcomes for patients with complex and serious illness," Mayo Clinic’s Chief Financial Officer Dennis Dahlen said.

Related Topics: MAYO CLINIC
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