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MSC in Winona to unveil new advanced manufacturing program

Phase one of the new Advanced Manufacturing Infrastructure Initiative at Minnesota State College Southeast's Winona campus will be unveiled Monday.

WINONA — Phase one of the new Advanced Manufacturing Infrastructure Initiative at Minnesota State College Southeast's Winona campus will be unveiled Monday. 

The college will offer tours of its new CNC Precision Machine Tool Lab from 3:30-4:30 p.m.

The new Advanced Manufacturing Lab is a collaboration of Winona area manufacturers, businesses, organizations and individuals that support the college through the Advanced Manufacturing Infrastructure Initiative. Nearly $600,000 has been raised to help refurbish and equip technical lab spaces. The CNC Precision Machine Tool lab is ready to welcome students when fall semester begins.

"Students need to train on the same kind of equipment they will be using in real-world manufacturing positions," said Travis Thul, dean of Trade and Technology for the college. "We have brand new automated CNC lathes, CNC mills, manual processes including advanced digital readouts, and 3D printing capabilities, not to mention a completely overhauled infrastructure within the facility itself."

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