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Olmsted County logo gets new look

Olmsted County unveiled a new logo Monday.

Olmsted County logo
Olmsted County logo

Olmsted County unveiled a new logo Monday. 

It's an update after more than 30 years.

The previous county logo incorporated a Rochester city skyline, said Debra Ehret Miller, the county's director of policy, analysis and communications. "However, the logo was developed in the 1980s, and Rochester’s skyline has changed since then."

Ehret Miller also said the logo with the skyline never fully represented the entire county. A new logo was needed to embody Olmsted County’s eight cities -- Byron, Chatfield, Dover, Eyota, Oronoco, Pine Island, Rochester and Stewartville -- as well as 18 townships, and approximately 154,000 residents.

To that end, Olmsted County has simplified the logo to reflect a more modern look. The new design is without a skyline and has a contemporary font and adjusted colors. The familiar "O" in the logo remains and is a symbol to represent all of Olmsted County.

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"We believe this refreshed logo better aligns with Olmsted County’s mission of providing the foundation of a vibrant community," Ehret Miller said.

People will begin seeing the updated logo on Olmsted County print materials, online websites, marketing items, as well as signs. The old logo will remain in some places as the new logo is phased in and the existing supply of older materials is depleted.

"This is an exciting year for us," Ehret Miller said. "Olmsted County has placed an increased focus on communications, both internal and external, and we look forward to better serving the community with a brand new website as well. Look for that to be unveiled later in 2020."

Olmsted County logo

Related Topics: OLMSTED COUNTY
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