ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Pilot killed in plane crash near Red Wing

A 73-year-old pilot was found dead Saturday after the single-engine Cessna he was flying crashed Friday near Red Wing.

We are part of The Trust Project.

A 73-year-old pilot was found dead Saturday after the single-engine Cessna he was flying crashed Friday near Red Wing.

Richard Schweitzer, of Watersmeet, Mich., was the lone occupant of the plane, according to the Pierce County Sheriff's Office.

On Saturday, both the Minnesota and Wisconsin wings of the Civil Air Patrol were searching for the plane, which had left northeastern Wisconsin early afternoon on Friday and was headed to Nebraska.The plane's last known location was 3 miles southeast of the Red Wing Regional Airport.

Shortly after 6 p.m., the Pierce County Sheriff's Office was contacted by Civil Air Patrol to report a possible crash location. Deputies, along with Ellsworth Fire and Red Wing Ambulance responded to a farm field north of 130th Ave. near 570th St. in Bay City, Wis., where they found the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration and that National Transportation Safety Board have taken over the crash-site investigation.

What to read next
Experts warn that simply claiming the benefits may create paper trails for law enforcement officials in states criminalizing abortion. That will complicate life for the dozens of corporations promising to protect, or even expand, the abortion benefits for employees and their dependents.
Dear Mayo Clinic: I am 42 and recently was diagnosed with diabetes. My doctor said I could manage the condition with diet and exercise for now but suggested I follow up with a cardiologist. As far as I know, my heart is fine. What is the connection between diabetes and heart health?
In Minnesota, abortion is protected by the state’s constitution and is legal up to the point of viability, which is generally thought to begin at about 24 weeks, when the fetus can survive outside the womb. Those who work with Minnesotans who seek abortions say barriers, both legal and practical, forced some to travel to Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, Washington, D.C., and Wisconsin even prior to the Supreme Court’s decision.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist says it's important to remember that we can't "fix" aging for our parents, but we can listen with empathy and validate their feelings.