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Police investigate discovery of man's body

A man believed to be 34 years old was found deceased in a hotel parking lot early Monday.

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The Rochester Police Department is investigating the death of a man after his body was found near a Rochester hotel's dumpster early Monday.

Rochester police were called just before 5 a.m. Monday to the Best Western, 1517 16th St. SW, for a report of a man who appeared to be dead by the hotel's dumpsters.

Police confirmed that the man was dead. The man, described as a white male approximately 34 years old, is believed to have been a guest at the hotel since May, according to Capt. Casey Moilanen. The man's identity has not been released, as police are waiting confirmation and need to notify the man's next of kin. He is not believed to be from Rochester and was likely in town working on a construction project.

Moilanen said there were no signs the man was assaulted. Police believe his death may have been caused by a medical issue, but that determination will be made by the Southern Minnesota Regional Medical Examiner's Office.

Emily Cutts is the Post Bulletin's public safety reporter. She joined the Post Bulletin in July 2018 after stints in Vermont and Western Massachusetts.
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