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Rochester woman gets probation for reckless driving charge

A Rochester woman was sentenced Friday to a year of probation after pleading guilty to a reckless driving charge.

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A Rochester woman was sentenced Friday to a year of probation after pleading guilty to a reckless driving charge.

Sharada Yanambaka, 25, was sentenced by Judge Jeffrey Thompson in Olmsted County District Court to a year of supervised probation. Yanambaka pleaded guilty to misdemeanor reckless driving. A felony and a gross misdemeanor charge of criminal vehicular operation-great bodily harm-under the influence of a controlled substance were both dismissed.

Yanambaka was behind the wheel of a Toyota C4E on the evening of April 21, 2018, when it ran a stop sign on County Road 8 and collided with a Chevy Malibu westbound on Highway 30.

A juvenile female suffered a half-inch cut on her tongue, and the driver of the Malibu, an adult woman, suffered multiple fractures and needed surgery on her fibula, according to court documents.

A Minnesota State Trooper who responded to the crash reported that he could smell "a very strong odor of fresh marijuana coming from the Toyota," according to court documents. A blood sample taken from Yanambaka about two hours after the crash was reviewed by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Marijuana was found in her blood, according to court documents.

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