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Twin Cities archbishop calls for immigration reform

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MINNEAPOLIS — Twin Cities Archbishop John Nienstedt is calling for federal immigration reform that provides a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants.

Nienstedt hosted a panel discussion on immigration reform Wednesday at the St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis. Tonight, Winona Diocese Bishop John Quinn is holding an immigration ecumenical prayer service at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Rochester. The service is at 7 p.m.

Nienstedt says each immigrant is a person, and each possesses "fundamental inalienable rights that must be respected."

The Star Tribune reports nearly 200 people attended the event, where Catholic clergy, local business leaders and public policy advocates urged U.S. House members to support President Barack Obama's call for new immigration laws.

Supporters of immigration policy changes argue they're needed because the current system is not working.

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Nienstedt's appearance marked a return to politics for the Catholic leader following the church's failed campaign last year to ban gay marriage in Minnesota.

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