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Paul John Scott

Health Reporter

Paul John Scott is the health reporter for NewsMD and the Rochester Post Bulletin. He is a novelist and was an award-winning magazine journalist for 15 years prior to joining the FNS in 2019.

His areas of coverage include health care, population health, health policy, behavioral sciences, medicine, clinical trials, physical fitness, diet and nutrition, basic sciences and the social and cultural context of personal health.

He lives in Rochester with his wife, two children and Scottish Terrier.

Pronouns: He/him
Languages: English

Email: pscott@forumcomm.com

Phone: (507) 285-7726

Study looked at rates of gonorrhea and chlamydia in Iowa following the 2017 law that restricted the use of federal funds for clinics that provided abortion services. Those clinics also provided testing and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.
The new medical journal, Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Digital Health, promises a hybrid of communication formats. The announcement coincided with a gathering of venture capital and healthcare start-up proprietors in downtown Rochester.
A new study of communications between doctors and parents of critically ill infants found that references to death or dying skirted the words themselves 92% of the time. Families mostly used colloquialisms for death, researchers learned, while doctors mostly used medical jargon.
Mayo Clinic study finds one-third of messages referred to a doctor by their first name. Women physicians were twice as likely to be "untitled" through patient communications deploying the use of a doctor's first name, and male patients were more likely to commit the error than female patients.
In a first-person essay published by the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Charlotte Brown, a Mayo Clinic graduate student who is blind, describes a demorializing morning seeking care at the world-reknowned medical center -- the kind of experience that could happen at any medical center. The article outlines a framework for training of staff in healthier interactions with the visually impaired.
It was the greatest drug ever discovered, until it wasn't. In a first showing of its second historical film on the discovery of cortisone, Mayo Clinic has moved closer to a broader conversation about the conflicted legacy of the famous compound.
The study identified criticism and interference as the two commonly-endorsed kinds of dietary undermining.
Town hall on health care in rural Minnesota looks into structural solutions for a looming crisis in outstate hospitals, one that could soon leave small towns struggling to provide the basics of care.
Study found those who could not pass a simple test had twice the risk of mortality.
Following an internal change at the clinic allowing vaccinated employees to work without masks in areas of no patient contact, the clinic's expansive Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center now allows members to work out without face coverings for the first time since the start of the pandemic.