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LEE HILGENDORF

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When the "King of Jazz" stopped by to perform in Rochester.
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The control tower, added during World War II, brought the airport into the modern age.
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One of Rochester's early filling stations slowly morphed into an auto parts store.
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The Green Parrot drew customers from around Rochester and across the country.

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The huge elm tree that had stood at the corner of Second Avenue and First Street Southwest for more than 60 years was gone. By 10:45 a.m. on the morning of September 4, 1945, the last branches were being loaded on a truck and the sidewalk engineers were dispersing.
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By late 1942, Rochester was becoming a military town. The Fontana School of Aeronautics used the Rochester Airport for training glider pilots. Rochester Junior College provided space for classroom instruction, and cadets were quartered in the Heffron School building.
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During the decade of the 1930s, in the depths of the Great Depression, people learned to be resourceful — such was the case for Perry Beach, a Rochester handyman. Beach needed a way to move his stucco spraying equipment to different job sites. A new truck dedicated for that purpose would have been ideal but most likely out of the question.
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It’s spring and a young man’s fancy turns to thoughts of motorcycles and bicycles, and that was good news for Leo Herrick. In 1922, if you were the spirited and outdoorsy type, all you had to do was head down to 308 S. Broadway. There, Leo would show you the newest in motorcycles by Harley-Davidson or Indian.
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What would you do if you had a fleet of delivery trucks, all having rubber tires, and rubber tires were no longer available? That was the problem facing James Pruett’s Star Laundry and Cleaners after the outbreak of World War II. All rubber was being diverted to the war effort, leaving fleet owners flat.
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On May 31, 1933, Mayo Properties Association gifted a building site on the corner of Second Street and Third Avenue Southwest to the City of Rochester for the purpose of building a new library.

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Chateau Theatre remodeled in 1941 to accommodate a new popcorn machine.
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In December 1933, Mr. Arthur Gooding, president of the First National Bank of Rochester, sent a letter to the home office of the world’s largest store, Sears, Roebuck and Co. The letter touted the virtues of Rochester as a location for a Sears store and if the company were to build here, the First National Bank was ready to offer its services.
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Construction of "the beltline" was delayed a year.

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