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TIM WALZ

The top priority for Minnesota anti-abortion groups following the overturning of Roe v. Wade is winning elections in November. But even with the state Legislature and governor's office, passing sweeping bans could be a far reach.
Executive order also aims to protect North Dakotans and other out of state residents who seek abortion in Minnesota
Minnesota could become an island for abortion access in the Midwest in the wake of Supreme Court decision on abortion.

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Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz is floating a proposal to double the original $500 "Walz checks" he pitched earlier this year. But the odds of that happening appear slim as lawmakers failed to reach a deal to return to the Capitol for a special legislative session.
States including Florida, Georgia and Maryland have enacted state gas tax holidays, and while Minnesota has not yet taken action to reduce prices, some leaders and candidates have floated similar ideas.
Between Jan. 1 and May 31, Gov. Tim Walz’s reelection campaign raised nearly $1.8 million and now has $4.46 million on hand heading into the summer. Republican challenger Scott Jensen raised about $472,000 in the same period and had $663,000 on hand as of May 31.
Tim Walz accepted his party’s endorsement for a second term as governor during the Minnesota DFL State Convention on Friday, May 20, 2022, at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester.
The call to defend abortion rights animates the DFL convention Friday night in Rochester.
Gov. Tim Walz visited Benson and viewed some of the damage caused by a May 12 storm. State officials said people affected by the storm should take photos and document what they do in cleaning up, as the Federal Emergency Management Agency will be seeking that information when it assesses the damage in 49 affected Minnesota counties.

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Festivities for the 74th Governor’s Fishing Opener were held in Cass Lake and on Lake Winnibigoshish in Leech Lake Nation.
And how the unemployment tax hike will be returned to businesses.
As the end of the legislative session looms, lawmakers consider rebates, credits and rate cuts

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