May 25 marks the one-year anniversary of the murder of George Floyd.

We're collecting local responses from the people it affected most. And we want to hear from you.

1. How will you recognize the anniversary date on May 25? How would you suggest or wish others do so?

2. What has changed with regard to race relations in the last year? Have things improved or gotten worse?

3. Did the guilty verdict in the Chauvin case mark a turning point? Are you confident that justice will be served?

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4. How do you regard the protests of last summer?

Send your responses (or any other thoughts) to rochesterincolor@postbulletin.com.


Melinda Rogers, Certified Nursing Assistant and Trained Medication Aide who just recently graduated with her Associate of Applied Science degree

How will you recognize the anniversary date on May 25?

Take time aside to pray for the nation's healing. Pray for grace and that Racism be annihilated.

What has changed with regard to race relations in the last year?

From my perspective here in Rochester, I have seen some improvement. I have seen more compassion and caring for people of color. My family and I have had several random acts of kindness from total strangers.

Melinda Rogers (contributed photo)
Melinda Rogers (contributed photo)

Did the guilty verdict in the Chauvin case mark a turning point?

Yes, according to the law, justice has prevailed. And it shows that no one is above the law. You have to be held accountable for your actions regardless of who you are. But George Floyd's children and family will never be able to talk to him, hug him and love on him again. As a Christian woman, I pray for Chauvin's eternal salvation.

How do you regard the protests of last summer?

The protests last summer in Rochester were very safe, peaceful, well organized, and people of all color came together as a caring community. As we all watched on television the horrific murder of George Floyd, communities all over the Nation/World were outraged and displayed their emotions.

We all had enough of our Black and Brown sons, husbands, nephews, cousins, grandsons, and friends being mistreated, abused, and killed because of the pigment of our skin. Martin Luther King Jr., quoted: "I look to a day when people will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. We are all imperfect people living in an imperfect world. Regardless of our character flaws death shouldn't have to be the consequence."


Shaketa Clark, of Rochester

Shaketa Clark (Contributed photo)
Shaketa Clark (Contributed photo)

What has changed with regard to race relations in the last year?

Millions of protests across the nation called for police reform. We now have a liaison in our community to help with communication between our culture and police. Things have gotten a bit worse but it always gets worse before it gets better within our history of the struggle for justice.

How do you regard the protests of last summer?

By cycles of protests over systematic injustice and racism, it is very important the I myself, being of an African American culture, must keep George Floyd's memory alive so that the generations after can be more aware and educate themselves and generations to come of such injustice so they're not bound by racism but free from any and all prisons in-depth just because of the color of their skin! As the late Dr.Martin Luther King preached on that great day. "Free At Last, Free At Last, Thank God Almighty We're Free At Last!"


Katherine Sublett, Community Leader

How will you recognize the anniversary date on May 25?

I will recognize the anniversary by rewinding the words, "I want my Mama." That will resonate with me and in my heart forever. I hope that others will reflect on their personal character and integrity. I would hope that others are doing a heart and soul tune-up.

Katherine Sublett (submitted photo)
Katherine Sublett (submitted photo)

What has changed with regard to race relations in the last year? Have things improved or gotten worse?

I don't believe anything has changed with race relations. It has heightened awareness to the power of the "camera" capturing what's been happening for decades. Brutality and violence amongst humans seem to be the new "normal." I'm not sure how to answer the second question. How can it get worse? When it's acceptable to kill a man in broad daylight on camera, then appeal the punishment.

Did the guilty verdict in the Chauvin case mark a turning point?

The guilty verdict didn't turn anything around. It sent a whisper that "the world witnessed" your previous "allowed" behavior. I'm confident the "minimal" amount of justice will be served. I'll be shocked if the sentence exceeds 10 years.

How do you regard the protests of last summer?

I don't support hurting people. Riots tend to be the only language the "privilege" understands. When you cost the privileged money, they are more inclined to listen.