We see that you have javascript disabled. Please enable javascript and refresh the page to continue reading local news. If you feel you have received this message in error, please contact the customer support team at 1-833-248-7801.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

U.S. Department of Education announces $51.7 million in grants to help disadvantaged students

Grants awarded to universities and colleges in 45 states and Puerto Rico.

Students Studying in a Library
African american College student using a digital tablet for doing research in the lecture room.
Getty Images
We are part of The Trust Project.

U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona recently announced $51.7 million in 189 new grant awards to institutions of higher education across the United States as part of the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair).

The program provides grants to universities and colleges for projects designed to provide disadvantaged college students effective preparation for doctoral studies.

“When we look at U.S. students studying to become our future physicians, professors, scientists and other crucial professionals requiring graduate degrees, many demographic groups are underrepresented, including first-generation college students and those from low-income families,” said Nasser Paydar, assistant secretary, Office of Postsecondary Education. “McNair grants fund projects at universities and colleges that help underrepresented students to access doctoral programs.”

The announcement delivers on Secretary Cardona’s priorities to expand equitable access to education and make higher education more inclusive and affordable. Through McNair grant funding, projects at institutions of higher education provide students opportunities for research or other scholarly activities, such as summer internships and seminars. McNair-funded initiatives also prepare students for doctoral study through tutoring, academic counseling, and assistance with securing admission to and financial assistance for enrollment in graduate programs. McNair projects may also provide services designed to improve financial and economic literacy of students, mentoring programs, and exposure to cultural events and academic programs not usually available to disadvantaged students.

The list of grantees includes 14 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), and 55 Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) (including Hispanic Serving, Native American-Serving Non-Tribal Institutions, Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions).

ADVERTISEMENT

In Minnesota, grant recipients include Augsburg University ($261,885), the University of Minnesota Morris ($261,888), the College of St. Scholastica ($293,316), St. Olaf College ($261,888), Bemidji State University ($261,888), and the Regents of the University of Minnesota ($348,828).

Several additional McNair awards will be announced on a second slate, expected in September.

The McNair program is one of seven federal TRIO programs, targeted to serve and assist low-income individuals, first-generation college students, and individuals with disabilities to progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to postbaccalaureate programs. Research from the National Center for Education Statistics shows demographic trends for enrollment in postbaccalaureate programs, from 2009-2020.

Related Topics: ALL-ACCESS
Our newsroom occasionally reports stories under a byline of "staff." Often, the "staff" byline is used when rewriting basic news briefs that originate from official sources, such as a city press release about a road closure, and which require little or no reporting. At times, this byline is used when a news story includes numerous authors or when the story is formed by aggregating previously reported news from various sources. If outside sources are used, it is noted within the story.
What to read next
Acacia Ward founded Reach the Top MN, a nonprofit built to be a one-stop shop for help with food, education, legal and shelter needs, in February 2022.
The learning doesn't just go one way.
Meet RISE Scholar Alizeh Rizvi.