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Minnesota DNR wants your opinion on proposed fishing rules

Rule changes for specific lakes planned for walleye, panfish, trout and pike.

lake trout
The Minnesota DNR is asking for public input on proposed rule changes for fishing on several lakes and rivers across the state.
Contributed / Wisconsin DNR
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DULUTH — Minnesotans can weigh in on proposed special fishing regulations that, if adopted, would become effective in 2023 on several lakes across the state.

The DNR is considering experimental and special fishing regulations for walleye in Big Sandy Lake in Aitkin County and Island and Round lakes in Itasca County; panfish in Dyers Lake in Cook County and Sand Lake in Lake County; brown trout in the Vermillion River in Dakota County; lake trout in Caribou Lake in Itasca County; and northern pike in West Battle, Otter Tail, and Turtle River Chain of Lakes in Otter Tail and Beltrami counties.

Find out more and comment online at mndnr.gov/FishRegs . Comments will be accepted through Oct. 17. For more detailed information contact the local fisheries off. A list is available at mndnr.gov/Areas/Fisheries . General input may also be submitted to Jon Hansen at jon.hansen@state.mn.us or 651-259-5239. The DNR also will be hosting in-person open houses on various dates between Sept. 1 and Oct. 5 in each county where the proposed changes would apply.

John Myers reports on the outdoors, natural resources and the environment for the Duluth News Tribune. You can reach him at jmyers@duluthnews.com.
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