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HISTORICAL TRUE CRIME

Under the bold headline “Murdered for Money,” a Bemidji Daily Pioneer story from June 8, 1904, broke the news that a father and daughter had gone missing from the tiny town of Quiring, Minnesota.
Husband killed wife, mother-in-law, then himself in apparent money dispute
It was a late winter morning when a cashier's son was returning a borrowed typewriter to the Miltona State Bank in Miltona, Minnesota, and discovered a tampered vault door and an empty safe. Cans of cream, filled with water next to the safe, told the tale. The 'Cream Can Gang' had struck again.
Over time, Dr. Leslie Keeley’s injection became known as the “Gold Cure,” named for its supposed content. Later analysis cast doubt on the idea that gold was used at all, but a foundational principal of Keeley's treatment centers continues today, in programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous.

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As viewers rush to binge-watch 'Conversations with a Killer: The John Wayne Gacy Tapes' Netflix’s latest true crime series on John Wayne Gacy, Minnesotans are reminded that two of the Killer Clown’s victims called Minnesota home.
When a gunman killed a police officer in Hope, North Dakota, in 1933, the county sheriff wasn't about to take it lying down. He persisted to track the suspect for two years over seven states and thousands of miles -- one of the most highly publicized manhunts in U.S. history.
After a 1933 bank robbery in Okabena, Minnesota two theories emerged about the culprits. Initially thought to be the work of famed outlaws Bonnie and Clyde, three locals were arrested and convicted of the crime -- but one researcher is certain they didn't do it.
It’s like something out of an old western -- a good guy shot in a saloon. What followed was the hunt for the killer, seeking justice for the victim and a family that decided they would thrive in spite of it all.

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