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Quaal Dairy in Otter Tail County sold off most of its herd in April. Vernon Quaal says the 2021 drought drastically cut into its feed supply and the rising prices for feed made maintaining the 300 cow herd unstainable. Quaal says many dairies are suffering. But he is determined to build back up, with a crop of bred heifers ready to calve in September.
The recent report called Understanding Minnesota's Wool Economy cited low financial reward, difficulty marketing and the cost of processing as the biggest barriers to Minnesota shepherds selling wool.
Wolff's Suffolks has been in the Suffolk industry for over 40 years. But recently, the ranch decided to diversify and sell their lamb to consumers and restaurants.
A series of storms brought around 4 feet of snow to some parts of the region. While the storm and its aftermath continue to stress ranchers and cattle, there is optimism that it spells the beginning of the end of a dry cycle.

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BetterFed Beef, a Minnesota based beef company, has trademarked a new breed, Certified Onya, which has proven to be as tender than Wagyu beef.
Hay prices are up $50-$100 per ton over last year, part of the lingering effects of a drought in northern Minnesota and much of the western U.S.
Ferndale raises its turkeys free range and with no antibiotics, a rarity in the nation’s No. 1 turkey producing state. Birds will be outdoors from some time in April right up the big rush of processing right before the Thanksgiving holiday.
Dr. Nathan Kjelland and his wife, Britt Jacobson, opened an 11,000 square foot large and small animal clinic on the west edge of Park River, North Dakota, in January 2022.
More than just learning how to evaluate livestock, youth participants in livestock judging are gaining real workforce development skills.
Complaints of wolves attacking livestock and pets in Minnesota were down 21% in 2021.

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On land that was farmed as a dairy for over 50 years, Tiffany Tripp and Andy Olson run Graise Farm, where they raise a few hundred ducks for eggs, chickens for eggs and farrow-to-finish pastured pork.
On top of minimizing erosion and maximizing water retention, cover crops can feed livestock year-round.
Beef producer Ed Melroe of Kulm, North Dakota, is among the producers who say the current times continue to be unsustainable for cow-calf producers and feeders. The Hellwig family that operates Hub City in Aberdeen, South Dakota, describes the big numbers of animals they are dealing with, and that even with higher prices producers are hit with the cost-price squeeze.

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