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NURSING

The charges filed with the National Labor Relations Board were dropped after the Minnesota Nurses Association agreed to its new contracts with hospitals.
Members of the Minnesota Nurses Association have agreed to the contract agreements reached with Twin Ports and Twin Cities hospitals last week. The contracts will last for three years.
The strike will begin Dec. 11, unless tentative contract agreements are made with hospitals before then. Nurses at Essentia and Twin Cities hospitals would strike for three weeks, until Dec. 31.
The 15,000 union nurses at 15 hospitals in Minnesota and Wisconsin will vote Nov. 30. The vote could give MNA leaders the power to authorize another strike, following a three-day strike held in September, as they bargain for contracts.

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The six-week classes at the Winona and Red Wing campuses are free under the state of Minnesota's Next Generation Nursing Assistant Training Program.
The nurses' union and hospital management remain at odds over pay, staffing levels and whether nurses should have more say in staffing decisions.
The health care system claims the Minnesota Nurses Association failed to include Essentia Health-Duluth in its list of facilities that received a strike notice.
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The Minnesota Nurses Association, which announced plans for 15,000 nurses to strike for three days starting Sept. 12, said Thursday they still plan to hold their strike, despite the charges.
The strike, which includes 15,000 nurses across 16 hospitals in the Twin Cities, Twin Ports and Moose Lake, will begin Sept. 12.
The vote among 15,000 Minnesota Nurses Association members was "overwhelmingly" in favor of the strike, according to MNA.

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Members of the Minnesota Nurses Association will decide whether to strike following what they see as a lack of action from hospital executives during contract negotiations.
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Mary Price signed up to serve after graduating from Saint Marys School of Nursing in 1966.
As COVID hospitalization rates stabilize, at least for now, and federal and state COVID relief funding dries up, travel nurse contracts that were plentiful and lucrative are vanishing. And after the pressure cooker of the past two-plus years led to staff turnover and a rash of early retirements, hospitals nationwide are focused on recruiting full-time nurses.

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